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Adventure Games Thread 2022 - We CAN use these things together

The Cockatrice

Gold Member
I hope it sells less than Thimbleweed Park.

not nice martin freeman GIF by BBC
 
The upcoming adventure by Clock & Dagger Games formerly known as Incantamentum has been renamed The Excavation of Hob's Barrow and brought into the Wadjet Eye fold as their latest published game. As such Dave Gilbert will naturally be voice directing the game and has done an interview with Rock Paper Shotgun about the project.

Also, a sequel to 2021's "Almost My Floor" has been announced. Never played the first one, the art style didn't really jive with me so I didn't follow it too closely. This game has significantly improved in the looks department IMO so I hope it turns out good.




The story of house #9 should have been the end of mysterious events in the city. Yet, there are even darker times to come. Newspapers are full of missing people, and citizens are afraid of uncertainty. One day you were having fun watching horror movies, only to experience it the next day. Overcome your fears or succumb to madness - there is no other choice.

Almost My Floor is a detective story in the Point-and-Click genre. Balancing on the edge of fiction and reality, you have to solve the mysteries of the dark city. And hurry, while your sanity holds! You will find many secrets, puzzles, and riddles. Overcome every challenge, and save yourself, your loved ones, and the whole city.



The game has three main characters, each with their history and worldview. Different points of view let you see the whole picture and fully experience the story. Only by joining forces, the protagonists will be able to escape.

Masha is a simple girl from a small town who came to find a better life in a big city. She has to solve the mysteries happening in this city. And maybe she will find out what happened to her loved ones.
Adam Trust is a private detective, recently famous for solving Dr. Freudgele's case. Adam thought he solved every mystery of house №9 and put the criminal in prison. But the reality is not that simple. The main case of his career is yet to come.
Chloe Freudgele is the daughter of a genius psychiatrist and scientist. She's smart beyond her years. Chloe strives to clear her father's name and begins her investigation of the case.

  • Different story routes.
  • Unexpected story endings that depend on your choices during the playthrough.
  • Many engaging puzzles and riddles will test your wits.
  • Elements of action horror. Stay alert! Death comes way too easy in this nightmarish world.
  • Colorful comic style.
 
Going through my backlog and finishing some abandoned games before so much time elapses that I'd just have to replay them entirely. Tasokare Hotel is a Japanese adventure game by SEEC. I've become somewhat of a fan of their games having played Yotsume God and Tsumugu Logic recently. SEEC's stuff has some rough edges, the English translations vary from sub-par to borderline Google tier and they've got the typical gacha style mobile game issues which plague that corner of gaming (which I shamelessly circumvent using mods). Still, they produce genuinely interesting stories and don't hold punches with dark narrative turns in a way I appreciate.

In Tasokare Hotel you play as a girl named Neko Tsukuhara who finds herself in a purgatory-esque realm between living and death but she can't remember who she is or how she arrived there. Neko eventually makes her way to the titular hotel, which is a place where lost spirits regain their identities and discover whether they're truly dead or still clinging to life. Seeing as Neko isn't quickly regaining her memory she's taken on as staff, along with some other spirits in a similar predicament. The game plays out in chapters, most of which devoted to a new lost soul you must guide to their final stage. You do so by solving puzzles in their hotel rooms which uncover the guest's secrets, as well as confronting them in Ace Attorney style interrogations.


The puzzles are fun and a solid but fair challenge for 90% of the game, some of the tougher "riddle" style puzzles in the game's last chapter suffer from a lack of clarity that seems rooted in poor translation. There was one in particular, where even after reading the in game hint system's breakdown, I still didn't completely understand the solution. In general, though, it's a good time and the setup of puzzling through a spirit's room while simultaneously revealing more about their backstory is just a really clever way to combine narrative and gameplay in an adventure game. In addition, there's some branching depending on choices you make but you ultimately need to make the correct choices and get the each chapters "true end" to progress, the final chapter is a bit more open ended.


As the the game nears its conclusion the focus switches from individual guest based mysteries to the overarching mystery regarding Neko's identity and the circumstances of her death, which involves some of the other more "permanent" residents of Tasokare Hotel. Without saying too much, shit gets nuts in a thoroughly entertaining way. Neko's characterization is handled very differently to your typical game protagonists, she's rather stoic and driven by curiosity to the point of being basically insane but I found her journey extremely fun to follow along with.


I thoroughly enjoyed Tasokare Hotel, it's my favorite of the SEEC games I've played and Yotsume God was no slouch. It's a wonder so much the the game's charm survives its shoddy translation, but there's hope for the future on that front. SEEC has been porting its games to PC recently, adding new animation, removing the gacha BS, and giving them new localizations + bonus content. Yotsume God received this treatment previously and they just announced Tasokare Hotel: Renewel, if it's as good of an upgrade as they've done previously, they'll polish this hidden gem even further and make it an unambiguous recommend.

I'd give Tasokare Hotel an 8.4/10
 

Frogwares has announced their newest Sherlock Holmes game and it will be a full remake of their previous title "The Awakened." Only dipped my toe in this series at present but it's one I know I'll have to run through eventually.
 

Fuz

Member
I really wanted to play Norco and Chinatown Detective Agency and also replay Thimbleweed Park.


So I started playing Born Punk.
Haven't played much but impressions are really good so far, I liked the puzzles, I like the characters, their writing and their voice actors. I love a good cyberpunk setting. The story at this point seems very derivative of Cyberpunk 2077, but it's probably a common trope in these settings.
I have just a minuscole pet peeve with hotkeys, but it's no big deal at all - to highlight the hotspot you need to click the left mouse button and keep it clicked, not my preferred choice. Corollary: mouse wheel sends you to the main menu, and I keep clicking that by mistake when I want the hotspots.
As usual, what I'd really liked would have been full keybinding.
 

The Cockatrice

Gold Member
Maybe if you got it for free or a subscription. I didn't finish it, it just go tedious...

If you want some Lovecraft try Call of Cthulhu. I liked that one a lot more.

The modern Call of Cthulhu was meh. Dark Corners was amazing. I'll wait on a sale I guess. Wanted some lovecraft horror shit to play. Genre is kinda dying.
 

rkofan87

Member
I really wanted to play Norco and Chinatown Detective Agency and also replay Thimbleweed Park.


So I started playing Born Punk.
Haven't played much but impressions are really good so far, I liked the puzzles, I like the characters, their writing and their voice actors. I love a good cyberpunk setting. The story at this point seems very derivative of Cyberpunk 2077, but it's probably a common trope in these settings.
I have just a minuscole pet peeve with hotkeys, but it's no big deal at all - to highlight the hotspot you need to click the left mouse button and keep it clicked, not my preferred choice. Corollary: mouse wheel sends you to the main menu, and I keep clicking that by mistake when I want the hotspots.
As usual, what I'd really liked would have been full keybinding.
ot but fuz what is your avatar?
its a cool pic i know that.
 
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The Cockatrice

Gold Member
ot but fuz what is your avatar?
its a cool pic i know that.
 
I really wanted to play Norco and Chinatown Detective Agency and also replay Thimbleweed Park.


So I started playing Born Punk.
Haven't played much but impressions are really good so far, I liked the puzzles, I like the characters, their writing and their voice actors. I love a good cyberpunk setting. The story at this point seems very derivative of Cyberpunk 2077, but it's probably a common trope in these settings.
I have just a minuscole pet peeve with hotkeys, but it's no big deal at all - to highlight the hotspot you need to click the left mouse button and keep it clicked, not my preferred choice. Corollary: mouse wheel sends you to the main menu, and I keep clicking that by mistake when I want the hotspots.
As usual, what I'd really liked would have been full keybinding.

Eager to play Born Punk but I'm trying to stick to this kick of completing games I've left half finished before I do anything new again. Nice to know it's starting out good at least.
 

Fuz

Member
I really wanted to play Norco and Chinatown Detective Agency and also replay Thimbleweed Park.


So I started playing Born Punk.
Haven't played much but impressions are really good so far, I liked the puzzles, I like the characters, their writing and their voice actors. I love a good cyberpunk setting. The story at this point seems very derivative of Cyberpunk 2077, but it's probably a common trope in these settings.
I have just a minuscole pet peeve with hotkeys, but it's no big deal at all - to highlight the hotspot you need to click the left mouse button and keep it clicked, not my preferred choice. Corollary: mouse wheel sends you to the main menu, and I keep clicking that by mistake when I want the hotspots.
As usual, what I'd really liked would have been full keybinding.
Still playing but I want to add a few things. Really liking it so far. I thought it was mostly a narrative experience since the puzzles were very easy and the game mostly progressed with dialogues, but now, after I got all three characters together, I've been stumped for two days on a multiple puzzle scene and can't solve any... well, I actually solved one but I reloaded because my brutish solution* was how I DON'T want to solve it. Because yes, there's some moral choices in the game. Not sure how much they impact the gameplay and story (I'd say mildly), but it's pretty cool they're there. The story is very compelling, and I also really like their rendition of the virtual space.

There are few forced scenes like when the corpos ride the bar and just sit there instead of going up the stairs and getting Eevie. I understand that the devs wanted you to act on that instead of being a spectator, but it was very dumb and really bothered me, it's a bit annoying but nothing major.

Anyway, I'm really liking it. I hope it doesn't fuck up in the end.

Oh right. If this were a review I'd subtract two points just because FUCK the limited save slots. WHY? just... WHY? And why does it happen so often? 1990 was doing better than you, guys.



* although quite satisfying, not gonna lie.
 
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New trailer for NOVECT's "Killing and Solving Detective Adventure Game," tentatively titled "M." The trailer shows of some new music, environments and animation. It precedes a gameplay demo for BitSummit that will be showcased within the next day or two, so you can expect some more gameplay details coming forward soon.
 

Fuz

Member
Done with Born Punk. The ending is... good and bad at the same time.
Sure as fuck they ran out of money/time, it's really rushed and plays automatically while it shouldn't. It's an interesting, a bit unexpected, ending but it leaves too many questions open and things unresolved. Unsatisfactory. Maybe a cliffhanger for a sequel?
Anyway, it's a solid game.
 
Done with Born Punk. The ending is... good and bad at the same time.
Sure as fuck they ran out of money/time, it's really rushed and plays automatically while it shouldn't. It's an interesting, a bit unexpected, ending but it leaves too many questions open and things unresolved. Unsatisfactory. Maybe a cliffhanger for a sequel?
Anyway, it's a solid game.
I feared something like this might've happened because the developer went from promising a full game, to saying that Born Punk would launch episodically, then at some point transitioned back to saying it was a full game. Still looking forward to playing it, just wish this sort of thing didn't plague the indie scene.
 

Perfect Tides sequel announced for release in 2024. Seems will be playing as an older Mara who's moved to a bigger city. Looking forward to this coming out in 2030.

Edit: Development is also being crowdfunded like the original and the Kickstarter campaign is currently underway.
 
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For a moment I thought this was a hidden DS game, but it's actually a mobile game with a "dual screen" layout.

Might give this one a go.
How did you found out about this game?

I cant really remember, I found out about SEEC's games while doing a super deep dive on Japanese adventure games about half a year ago. I basically looked up every JADV game in existence and that's unfortunately only a mild exaggeration. It could have been as simple as going to Gamer.ne/some other Japanese gaming site and clicking through the adventure tag or a random google search, SEEC's games do have somewhat of a cult following so it's possible I saw something on Twitter.
 
Continuing my backlog bombing run with another game I left half finished: Return to Mysterious Island. This is a somewhat fondly remembered adventure game from the "dead era," which is more accurately described as the "eurojank & handheld era," but I digress. You play as a young sailor named Mina, who's engaged in some speed sailing type expedition when she gets swept up in a storm and washes up on the titular mysterious island. Survival is your top priority and so begins Mina's quest of many, many, many inventory puzzles. Really good ones! Return to Mysterious island has a very robust inventory system that allows for up to 6 or 7 part item combinations, certain items have multiple uses, and combined items can be deconstructed to re-use their base parts. It might appear overwhelming at first, but it's actually rather intuitive and adds to a real sense of the player using their own ingenuity to overcome the obstacles of the island.


The game is based on the famous novel "The Mysterious Island" by Jules Verne, and uses a clever framing device to incorporate aspects of that story while also telling its own tale. Mina arrives at the Island 150 years after the events of the book, which turn out to be a partially fictionalized account by Jules Verne to protect the privacy of the real captain Nemo. So there's something here for fans of the original without it feeling like a rehash or simple pandering. The game's actual plot is slight relative to most adventure games. There's some revelations about the prior inhabitants of the island and an occasional comic style cut-scene for the more eventful moments, but overall it's mostly "you're on a weird island try to survive and find a way off it." But I appreciated this as a welcome change of pace, the strength of the puzzles and charm of Mina working together with her monkey companion, Jep (who serves as a special inventory item with his own slot), more than carried the experience for me.


There are some unfortunate technical issues with this game on modern PCs, at least with the GOG version I played. Nothing too major, but some of the UI elements don't scale properly to fit where they should, sometimes buttons need to be pressed repeatedly before they actually react, and the comic panels in cutscenes are cut off occasionally. It's stuff on the margins of the overall experience and didn't much hinder my enjoyment of the game, but it's worth mentioning. Ultimately Return to Mysterious Island is a hidden-ish gem of the Eurojank era of adventure games and I had a great time playing it. I might even put my backlog journey on hold to play the sequel.

8.3/10
 

Fuz

Member
Continuing my backlog bombing run with another game I left half finished: Return to Mysterious Island. This is a somewhat fondly remembered adventure game from the "dead era," which is more accurately described as the "eurojank & handheld era," but I digress. You play as a young sailor named Mina, who's engaged in some speed sailing type expedition when she gets swept up in a storm and washes up on the titular mysterious island. Survival is your top priority and so begins Mina's quest of many, many, many inventory puzzles. Really good ones! Return to Mysterious island has a very robust inventory system that allows for up to 6 or 7 part item combinations, certain items have multiple uses, and combined items can be deconstructed to re-use their base parts. It might appear overwhelming at first, but it's actually rather intuitive and adds to a real sense of the player using their own ingenuity to overcome the obstacles of the island.


The game is based on the famous novel "The Mysterious Island" by Jules Verne, and uses a clever framing device to incorporate aspects of that story while also telling its own tale. Mina arrives at the Island 150 years after the events of the book, which turn out to be a partially fictionalized account by Jules Verne to protect the privacy of the real captain Nemo. So there's something here for fans of the original without it feeling like a rehash or simple pandering. The game's actual plot is slight relative to most adventure games. There's some revelations about the prior inhabitants of the island and an occasional comic style cut-scene for the more eventful moments, but overall it's mostly "you're on a weird island try to survive and find a way off it." But I appreciated this as a welcome change of pace, the strength of the puzzles and charm of Mina working together with her monkey companion, Jep (who serves as a special inventory item with his own slot), more than carried the experience for me.


There are some unfortunate technical issues with this game on modern PCs, at least with the GOG version I played. Nothing too major, but some of the UI elements don't scale properly to fit where they should, sometimes buttons need to be pressed repeatedly before they actually react, and the comic panels in cutscenes are cut off occasionally. It's stuff on the margins of the overall experience and didn't much hinder my enjoyment of the game, but it's worth mentioning. Ultimately Return to Mysterious Island is a hidden-ish gem of the Eurojank era of adventure games and I had a great time playing it. I might even put my backlog journey on hold to play the sequel.

8.3/10
Oh, that's a nice coincidence, I started it yesterday.
 
Played through Return to Mysterious Island 2 and the game started really strong but fumbles occasionally as it goes along. I wont say how for sake of spoilers, but you're back on the Island and it's not soon before one of Captain Nemo's robots alerts you that it's about to explode due to a motor, which was rigged to power various parts of the island, destabilizing and triggering a volcanic eruption. The adventure to save the island take's Mina and her monkey pal, Jep, into further regions of the island and further into the history of its past inhabitants.


There's a bigger focus on Mina and Jep's bond this time around. You can actually play as Jep too and there are bespoke mechanics for maintaining friendship with Mina and other monkeys you encounter. This adds some variety to the puzzle solving, and there's an occasional mini-game (one really horrid mini-game at the very end), but the bulk of the game is the same survival oriented item-use puzzling as the first game. Which is still good but the design isn't quite as tight this time around. In the first game you almost always had the information you needed to put things together somewhere in the game world. Even relatively obscure chemical reactions, etc, were knowable once you got the encyclopedia working on your phone. In Mysterious Island 2 there are some parts that lean too heavily on the player having real world knowledge and certain puzzles that give ambiguous/no feedback. So even if you understand what to do, it's difficult to understand how the game wants your knowledge communicated.


(An adorable moment where Jep paints a crude portrait of Mina.)
The narrative is a bit beefier compared to the original, Mina reacts and comments on her surroundings more, there's more dialogue, and more of a moral (or at least thematic takeaway) at the end. Most of it works well, especially the stuff between Mina and Jep, and there's interesting additions to the lore of the island, but the very ending dilemma/choice felt forced to me. It's one of those things where a character has to make some huge sacrifice for the sake of the story being dramatic, but in your head all you can think of is the numerous ways everything could've worked out fine. Far from the worst that's ever been committed to screen, but the first game managed to neatly avoid issues like this by just keeping things simple. But this game is an all too rare example of a western adventure game with a conversation log, so kudos to the devs for that.

Overall Return to Mysterious Island 2 retains a lot of what worked from the first game, adds a few cool things, but stumbles in some crucial areas that make it a lesser experience overall.
7/10
 
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Newly announced FMV adventure "Breakout" by ALT Lab is due for release later this year and, despite the Steam page paradoxically being written in English and claiming there's no English language support, the developers have confirmed English subs on the community page.
You play as a wayward teen who's family sends to a correctional center, wherein you're subjected to bizarre experiments and torture. From the description it seems to have a bit more interactivity than most FMV games nowadays:
Players will experience multiple interactive gameplay, including branching storylines, QTE, clue collection, reasoning synthesis, real-time monitoring, escape room puzzles, electric shock gameplay, etc.

Electric shock gameplay is a bit of a new one for me, but I'll keep an open mind.
 
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More in-game clips of Monkey Island as per Ron Gilbert's weekly drops. This time it's a brief conversation with Guybrush and Wally. I don't mind the backgrounds in this clip so much, compared to others I've seen, but a big problem is the jittery heads. Every time the characters talk it's like they've got a localized cranial form of Parkinson's or desperately need to switch to decaf. I guess this is to mimic the head movements in the original Monkey Island/LucasArts games?



But those were just intermittent gestures, they actually looked like (a simplified version of) how humans actually gesticulate and emote physically. In Return the faces constantly vibrate and it's weird to look at.
 
I cleared Mission Critical the other day. This is the 2nd Legend Entertainment game I've played, the first being Callahan's Crosstime Saloon which became a fast favorite. Like Callahan's I was very quickly impressed with Mission Critical and this became another all time favorite of mine. The game starts on a large space ship called the Lexington which is on a secret mission to planet named Persephone, before long the Lexington is ambushed by enemy forces. The situation is dire as the Lexington is completely out-gunned and the ship's captain, Danya (played by Michael Dorn), is forced to pull a desperate gambit: Surrender the crew under false pretenses, smuggle a bomb on to the enemy ship, and destroy both crews leaving only the player character behind to repair the Lexington and complete the mission.

The set up is done in a fantastic intro cutscene that, draw-backs of the era's technology aside, evokes my favorite brand of Star Trek-esque sci-fi -- with just a bit of a darker tinge. Afterwards it's you alone on the Lexington in a tense struggle to repair the ship's damaged systems and complete the mission. Typically these kind of solo/character interaction-less adventure games aren't the type I go for. So it's a testament to Legend Entertainment's knack for detail and wit that I managed to stay fully entertained the entire game. The mixture of fascinating technical tidbits and dry humor works perfectly. One moment you'll be getting a detailed explanation of the ship's material composition, the next you'll be getting an equally detailed, but hilarious, explanation of the ship's machine generated space food. You do wind up having lengthy conversations with the ships computer, there's the occasional video log, and the end off the game has some talking too, but the bulk of the story is told by reading discarded materials and observation. It's the character imbued in the game's descriptive writing that shines in lieu of deeper character interaction.



The gameplay is also great, using Callahan's as a comparison, that game occasionally faltered by requiring outside cultural knowledge to progress or hiding relatively obscure progression flags amidst detailed environments with too many options. In Mission Critical what you need to interact with is always clear, your goals are either clear or intuitive, and the solutions make you feel like you're actually surviving in space. There are some interface issues. Your list of verbs appears at the top left after clicking a hotspot in the environment, and it's a little awkward to constantly drag the cursor back to the top left of the screen to select actions. Likewise, scrolling through the inventory works by hovering over arrow buttons at either side of the inventory bar, which is already less convenient than just clicking, but to make things worse it scrolls with momentum which is unwieldy and unnecessary. Minor faults aside, this is high level adventure puzzling. There's nothing quite in the "stroke of genius" territory that I would ascribe to insult sword fighting, the disintegrating mugs puzzle, or AA's contradiction mechanic, but it's consistently very fun and gameplay well integrated with the plot.

As Mission Critical reaches reaches its close, and as you learn more about the nature of the secret mission and the two warring factions that lead to Danya's kamikaze maneuver, the plot shifts from being primarily about survival to expounding on the game's core themes. Themes of the tension between humanity's desire for progress and the instability that may come of it. The story takes some unexpected and fascinating twists at the end, that while completely bizarre, are still innkeeping with the pool of science fiction influences Mission Critical has been drawing from up to that point. It's all quite captivating and ends on an appropriate bittersweet note. A fantastic ending where you can tell which side of the conflict the authors come down on, but their world-view is robust enough about the nature of this conflict to add that warranted wrinkle of unease. Leaving the player wondering if they truly made the right choice, or if there is a "right choice" at all?



Well, in reality there is a right choice, the choice to play Mission Critical because the game kicks ass! 9/10
 
BTW, Fuz Fuz what ending did you get when you finished Perfect Tides? I recently went back and finally got the best ending and the final cutscene was great. Worth at least looking up on YT even if you don't replay the game.
 
New Tales from the Borderlands launches October 21 for PS5, Xbox Series, PS4, Xbox One, Switch, and PC - Gematsu

About

Take a stand against ruthless corporate overlords in this narrative-driven adventure!

Within the perpetually war-torn metropolis of Promethea, you’ll control Anu, Octavio, and Fran on the worst day of their lives. Help these three lovable losers as they endeavor to change the world (and maybe even save it)!

Face down a planetary invasion, vicious vault monster, and cold-hearted capitalist in this cinematic thrill ride where what happens next is up to you! Meet a motley cast full of misfits, assassin bots, and talking guns in this race to the top!

It’s time to fight back against exploitation and corporate greed. It’s time to make Mayhem your business. *

Key Features

  • Decide the fates of altruistic scientist Anu, her ambitious, “streetwise” brother Octavio, and the fierce, frogurt-slinging Fran. With nothing left to lose and everything to gain, you’ll claw and con your way through this thrilling five-part story!
  • The Borderlands aren’t just home to Vault Hunters, psychos, and weapons-corp CEOs—they’re full of downtrodden, intrepid civilians just trying to get by. With a host of returning and fresh faces, this unforgettable tale is sure to delight fans new and old.
  • The decisions you make determine how your story ends in unexpected ways. Whether it’s Anu’s vision of a universe that markets more than weapons, Octavio’s dreams of fame and fortune, or Fran’s frosty plot for revenge—their success or failure depends on you.

A few details have surfaced about the upcoming narrative adventure game New Tales from the Borderlands, a sequel to TellTale's episodic series from 2015 this time developed in house by Gearbox. Evidently there's three new main characters, and the game will be in five parts.
 

Fuz

Member
BTW, Fuz Fuz what ending did you get when you finished Perfect Tides? I recently went back and finally got the best ending and the final cutscene was great. Worth at least looking up on YT even if you don't replay the game.
I managed to complete her brother's present, but the picture puzzle timing was really confusing and I missed it. I'll check it out on YT.
 
Tintin and his faithful dog Snowy will set sail for incredible adventures! After meeting with the Egyptologist Sophocles Sarcophagus during a Mediterranean cruise, the famous reporter decides to investigate the Pharaoh Kih-Oskh’s tomb. What terrible secret does the tomb hide? From Egypt to India and Arabia, Tintin and Snowy will follow a lead on narcotics trafficking all the way to the far east.

This new adventure game will immerse players into the captivating comic book’s universe and make them the heroes of an epic action adventure masterpiece. With an art direction faithful to Hergé’s drawings, this game is lining up to be a jubilant adaptation!

- Faithfulness to the comics series
Featuring all the facets of the Tintin universe and with a story full of twists making part of Hergé’s great creative legacy, the game plunges you into the heart of mysterious Egypt and other lands of infinite beauty. “Cigars of the Pharaoh”, the 4th album of the series was prepublished in December 1932 in the youth supplement “Le Petit – Vingtième”.

- A lot of adventures to live
Join Tintin in a series of action-packed puzzles as he tries to solve an international drug trafficking case by exploring the Orient, but also an ancient temple, a desert the depths of a lush jungle and other magnificent but challenging locations.

- Many different gameplays to master
A unique and innovative gameplay combining all the key elements of adventure and investigation video games. A game that puts you in a reporter’s shoes, searching for clues, infiltrating hostile places and solving puzzles with the help of investigative dialogues sumptuously enriched with breathtaking video sequences.

Pendulo coming out with a yet another license based adventure, the third now after Blacksad and Vertigo. This time around they're working with Tintin, a franchise I've got next to no familiarity with but has always seemed cool enough. Pendulo is always a weird one for me, I tend to dislike most of the game's I've played from them, but I did quite like Blacksad and The Next BIG Thing is one of my favorite comedy adventures ever. Keeping a cautious eye on this one, at the very least it couldn't be worse than Vertigo.
 
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