Final Fantasy XVI development about “95 percent” complete; release date to be announced by end of 2022

Draugoth

Gold Member



Final Fantasy XVI is about “95 percent” complete, director Hiroshi Takai told Famitsu in a newly published interview.

“Currently, we’re playing through the game day after day, ironing out any rough patches, and brushing up some performance and rendering issues,” Takai said. “After that comes bug fixes.”

Final Fantasy XVI is currently announced for a summer 2023 release. When asked when a specific release date would be announced, producer Naoki Yoshida said Square Enix will share that information very soon.

“We’re planning to put out even more information before the end of the year, so I think we’ll be able to tell you [a release date] at that time,” Yoshida said. “It won’t be any later than summer, so don’t worry. (Laughs.)”

Yoshida was more specific when speaking to 4Gamer.net, stating that a new trailer would be released by the end of 2022, and that they should also be able to share a release date at that time.

Back to Famitsu, Yoshida continued, “Since I’ve grown so accustomed to the development environment of online games over these past few years, I was a little surprised at how quickly we had to go gold. (Laughs.) If you consider the production of physical discs, shipping them worldwide… all of that takes several months of physical time after going gold. So when we say development is 95 percent complete, some might say, ‘well then release it immediately,’ but that’s the reality of the situation…”

Yoshida also told Dengeki that a demo is planned.

Final Fantasy XVI is in development for PlayStation 5. Watch the latest trailer here.
 
Video Games Logo GIF by Square Enix


Looking forward to trying out the combat in the demo, I don't expect it to be as deep as Devil May Cry but somewhat close.
 
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I'm not gonna lie, something about this isn't drawing me in at all. Still buying at release though because on paper the gameplay sounds like it will be too good even if I end up not give a shit about the story and atmosphere.
 

Myths

Member
I’m glad they continue to evolve and remix the battle system with each entry. Trying different things makes the most sense for a franchise that practically strives to make sure every entry establishes its own identity in every aspect.
 

GymWolf

Gold Member
The usual reeeetard are crying for lack of diversity and the yoshi-P explanation for that :lollipop_squinting:

A demo for the game is nice, i want to see how much they pushed the dmc type of combat.
 

Caffeine

Member
I’m gonna keep saying this: all I want is proof that the game will have CGI cutscenes. Ty
i think 15 only had like 3? right this game seems like most of it is in engine there might be a intro or outro thats cgi. but i wouldnt expect like the old days.
personally feel forspoken will have more cgi in it.
 
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i think 15 only had like 3? right this game seems like most of it is in engine there might be a intro or outro thats cgi. but i wouldnt expect like the old days.
personally feel forspoken will have more cgi in it.
Well with XV we all know it only had 3 because of the constant story rewrites and it being accompanied by a 110 minute CGI movie.

That being said, I’m honestly expecting NO proper CGI cutscenes until proven otherwise, but I hope we get like 5-6 awesome ones.
 

Go_Ly_Dow

Member
What's their issue with this game?
Their issue is that like good radicalised Americans they can only view the world and humans through a racial lense and can't they comprehend that the entire world doesn't revolve around social issues and racial tension in America.

IGN: In regards to diversity in the game, can we expect to see Black characters in Final Fantasy XVI, or people of color (non-white characters) in general? To clarify a bit more, there’s been discussion around the trailers to date featuring mostly white characters, and I wanted to get clarity on whether we can expect the final game to be more diverse.

Naoki Yoshida, Producer:
This is a difficult question, but not one that was unexpected, seeing as diversity in entertainment media has become a much-discussed topic as of late. The answer I have, however, may end up being disappointing to some depending on individual expectations.

Our design concept from the earliest stages of development has always heavily featured medieval Europe, incorporating historical, cultural, political, and anthropological standards that were prevalent at the time. When deciding on a setting that was best suited to the story we wanted to tell—the story of a land beset by the Blight—we felt that rather than create something on a global scale, it was necessary to limit the scope it to a single landmass — one geographically and culturally isolated from the rest of the world in an age without airplanes, television, or telephones.

Due to the underlying geographical, technological, and geopolitical constraints of this setting, Valisthea was never going to realistically be as diverse as say a modern-day Earth...or even Final Fantasy XIV that has an entire planet (and moon) worth of nations, races, and cultures at its disposal. The isolated nature of this realm, however, does end up playing a large part in the story and is one of the reasons Valisthea’s fate is tied to the rest of the world.

Ultimately, we felt that while incorporating ethnic diversity into Valisthea was important, an over-incorporation into this single corner of a much larger world could end up causing a violation of those narrative boundaries we originally set for ourselves. The story we are telling is fantasy, yes, but it is also rooted in reality."

Conversely, the Final Fantasy series of games have always inherently dealt with conflict and struggle, especially between the empowered and those used and/or exploited by those privileged few—a prominent trend in human history. In a game that, by design, allows players to experience that conflict and struggle first- hand through dynamic, realistic battles, it can be challenging to assign distinctive ethnicities to either antagonist or protagonist without triggering audience preconceptions, inviting unwarranted speculation, and ultimately stoking flames of controversy. The best part of pulling inspiration directly from history, however, is that it allows us to revisit and re-examine our own pasts, while also allowing us to create something new.

In the end, we simply want the focus to be less on the outward appearance of our characters and more on who they are as people—people who are complex and diverse in their natures, backgrounds, beliefs, personalities, and motivations. People whose stories we can resonate with. There is diversity in Valisthea. Diversity that, while not all-encompassing, is synergistic with the setting we’ve created and is true to the inspirations from which we are drawing.
 
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samoilaaa

Member
Their issue is that like good radicalised Americans they can only view the world and humans through a racial lense and can't they comprehend that the entire world doesn't revolve around social issues and racial tension in America.

IGN: In regards to diversity in the game, can we expect to see Black characters in Final Fantasy XVI, or people of color (non-white characters) in general? To clarify a bit more, there’s been discussion around the trailers to date featuring mostly white characters, and I wanted to get clarity on whether we can expect the final game to be more diverse.

Naoki Yoshida, Producer:
This is a difficult question, but not one that was unexpected, seeing as diversity in entertainment media has become a much-discussed topic as of late. The answer I have, however, may end up being disappointing to some depending on individual expectations.

Our design concept from the earliest stages of development has always heavily featured medieval Europe, incorporating historical, cultural, political, and anthropological standards that were prevalent at the time. When deciding on a setting that was best suited to the story we wanted to tell—the story of a land beset by the Blight—we felt that rather than create something on a global scale, it was necessary to limit the scope it to a single landmass — one geographically and culturally isolated from the rest of the world in an age without airplanes, television, or telephones.

Due to the underlying geographical, technological, and geopolitical constraints of this setting, Valisthea was never going to realistically be as diverse as say a modern-day Earth...or even Final Fantasy XIV that has an entire planet (and moon) worth of nations, races, and cultures at its disposal. The isolated nature of this realm, however, does end up playing a large part in the story and is one of the reasons Valisthea’s fate is tied to the rest of the world.

Ultimately, we felt that while incorporating ethnic diversity into Valisthea was important, an over-incorporation into this single corner of a much larger world could end up causing a violation of those narrative boundaries we originally set for ourselves. The story we are telling is fantasy, yes, but it is also rooted in reality."

Conversely, the Final Fantasy series of games have always inherently dealt with conflict and struggle, especially between the empowered and those used and/or exploited by those privileged few—a prominent trend in human history. In a game that, by design, allows players to experience that conflict and struggle first- hand through dynamic, realistic battles, it can be challenging to assign distinctive ethnicities to either antagonist or protagonist without triggering audience preconceptions, inviting unwarranted speculation, and ultimately stoking flames of controversy. The best part of pulling inspiration directly from history, however, is that it allows us to revisit and re-examine our own pasts, while also allowing us to create something new.

In the end, we simply want the focus to be less on the outward appearance of our characters and more on who they are as people—people who are complex and diverse in their natures, backgrounds, beliefs, personalities, and motivations. People whose stories we can resonate with. There is diversity in Valisthea. Diversity that, while not all-encompassing, is synergistic with the setting we’ve created and is true to the inspirations from which we are drawing.
they didnt even include their own race , why would they include black ? why is it always about black people , why arnt the other people of color complaining so much ?
 

Klosshufvud

Member
I'm still upset Final Fantasy is no longer the turn-based JRPGs that made it my favorite franchise in the past. But, as a videogame in its own right, Final Fantasy XVI looks pretty incredible.
There is something about the slower pace and relaxing attitude of turn-based RPGs I do miss in newer games. Maybe instead of going full fast-paced action, FF16 should've opted for being a slower action game instead, more fitting for an RPG setting? But then I guess the similarities to Dark Souls would be very apparent.
 

Cyberpunkd

Gold Member
they didnt even include their own race , why would they include black ? why is it always about black people , why arnt the other people of color complaining so much ?
Most likely because people from other cultures and races do not identify so strongly with the colour of their skin. Blacks in the US are defined by their blackness. You have ‘Black Culture Month’, which makes the link between race and culture, which everyone knows doesn’t exist.

Japanese are yellow, so are the Chinese, Vietnamese , Koreans, etc. - completely different

Whites are Germans, French, Italians, Polish, etc. - once again completely different

Somali culture is completely different than African-Americans from Chicago, they have nothing in common
 

samoilaaa

Member
Most likely because people from other cultures and races do not identify so strongly with the colour of their skin. Blacks in the US are defined by their blackness. You have ‘Black Culture Month’, which makes the link between race and culture, which everyone knows doesn’t exist.

Japanese are yellow, so are the Chinese, Vietnamese , Koreans, etc. - completely different

Whites are Germans, French, Italians, Polish, etc. - once again completely different

Somali culture is completely different than African-Americans from Chicago, they have nothing in common
ok i get it but instead of black people complaining about lack of black people in a game made by white ( or in this case yellow ) people why dont black devs just make games with only black people ? make as many games with black people only and nobody will give a shit

dont try to make other people change their work according to you
 

Graciaus

Member
ok i get it but instead of black people complaining about lack of black people in a game made by white ( or in this case yellow ) people why dont black devs just make games with only black people ? make as many games with black people only and nobody will give a shit

dont try to make other people change their work according to you
The funny thing is it's white people complaining about everyone being white. It's always crazy white people being offended for everyone else.
 

samoilaaa

Member
The funny thing is it's white people complaining about everyone being white. It's always crazy white people being offended for everyone else.
i think both sides complain , the thing is that alot of these white people complain for the benefits for example in my country ( romania ) we have a minority called gypsies and alot of romanians , mostly politicians try to give them as many benefits as posible to get funds that they use themselves instead of giving to the gypsies , they take gypsies side because when its voting time they need them to make the difference , its all about benefits , nobody is doing anything for anybody for nothing in return especially these major parties ( votes , public image , money )

nothing is for free
 
ok i get it but instead of black people complaining about lack of black people in a game made by white ( or in this case yellow ) people why dont black devs just make games with only black people ? make as many games with black people only and nobody will give a shit

dont try to make other people change their work according to you
Bruh it’s white people complaining.
 

Go_Ly_Dow

Member
They better not change their creative vision because some bastard tried to shame them into having “diversity” in a medieval setting. That bastard interviewer is just a parasite feeding off attempted controversy for monetary gain, nothing more.
Given Yoshida's response I think he's got a firm stance and vision for the game and I won't buckle, especially when nearly complete.
 

wvnative

Member
They better not change their creative vision because some bastard tried to shame them into having “diversity” in a medieval setting. That bastard interviewer is just a parasite feeding off attempted controversy for monetary gain, nothing more.

It's far far too late for them to change something like this.
 

Lady Bird

Matsuno's Goebbels
they didnt even include their own race , why would they include black ? why is it always about black people , why arnt the other people of color complaining so much ?
The simple answer is that Resetera is a self-declared safespace (AKA, echo chamber), and like all echo chambers, it has gradually become more obsessive over time.

Yoshida's justification is clear and logical: XVI's world is inspired by/based on an isolated version of medieval Europe; that even though there is magic and fantasy, they still want to be realistic in that regard. Because Valisthea is isolated, its European-inspired nations should have little to no contact with different continents. This becomes clearer when we look at the map and see that Valisthea is entirely surrounded by sea, with no land corridors connecting it to foreign lands; and that's without taking into account all the cultural differences that are unique to it and we still know nothing about. We can also read between the lines that they still haven't went through a sea traveling/discovery period either.

But trying to discuss this with resetera is like trying to argue about god's existence with religious fanatics. They presume that their view is not only right but the one and only absolute truth, and arguing with them becomes a futile exercise and a big waste of time. They will use or misuse every argument possible to support their view, up to misinterpreting Yoshida's words (ignoring what he said about Valisthea being isolated, by using real-life Europe's medieval diversity as an example, with the complete disregard of the differences between real Europe and fictional Valisthea) or even disrespecting XVI's artistic vision (like using the poor and tired excuse that "this is fantasy! How can he say that having black people in it is unrealistic, when there's eikons and magic?") in an attempt that, ultimately, ends up defending a very subjective (and entitled) point of view: "our vision is better than yours!"
 
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The simple answer is that Resetera is a self-declared safespace (AKA, echo chamber), and like all echo chambers, it has gradually become more obsessive over time.

Yoshida's justification is clear and logical: XVI's world is inspired by/based on an isolated version of medieval Europe; that even though there is magic and fantasy, they still want to be realistic in that regard. Because Valisthea is isolated, its European-inspired nations should have little to no contact with different continents. This becomes clearer when we look at the map and see that Valisthea is entirely surrounded by sea, with no land corridors connecting it to foreign lands; and that's without taking into account all the cultural differences that are unique to it and we still know nothing about. We can also read between the lines that they still haven't went through a sea traveling/discovery period either.

But trying to discuss this with resetera is like trying to argue about god's existence with religious fanatics. They presume that their view is not only right but the one and only absolute truth, and arguing with them becomes a futile exercise and a big waste of time. They will use or misuse every argument possible to support their view, up to misinterpreting Yoshida's words (ignoring what he said about Valisthea being isolated, by using real-life Europe's medieval diversity as an example, with the complete disregard of the differences between real Europe and fictional Valisthea) or even disrespecting XVI's artistic vision (like using the poor and tired excuse that "this is fantasy! How can he say that having black people in it is unrealistic, when there's eikons and magic?") in an attempt that, ultimately, ends up defending a very subjective (and entitled) point of view: "our vision is better than yours!"

Basically the argument from Resetera, Reddit, and Game Journos boils down to “HOW DARE YOU NOT SUBMIT TO OUR SUPERIOR WESTERN SENSIBILITIES!!”
 
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