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First PC for 15 year old son - im clueless :)

EverydayBeast

thinks Halo Infinite is a new graphical benchmark
Pc gaming:
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Also pc gaming:
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Northeastmonk

Gold Member
Prebuilt is a good idea too. Imagine you’re the dad and you haven’t done it yourself and a fight happens when the kid can’t instantly run Steam before he installs the OS, GPU drivers, BIOS updates, and etc. Didnt put on the paste before you added the fan? Some dumb stuff like that could go either way. If I knew my child enjoyed learning and doing things on their own. That’s one thing. Kids don’t necessarily take pride in stuff like that. Only issue I have with prebuilds are those tacky neon lights they throw on everything gaming related.
 

avin

Member
If it is not a good offer - do you have a better pc setup in the same price range?

What's your endgame here? But short answer, if my 15-year old son gave me that build, I'd buy it for him. It's decent, not too pricey, some things will need fixing but not right now. He can take it from there.

avin
 
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hlm666

Member
LMAO. Some legit terrible advice in here. 600W is plenty for a Ryzen and 3060.
The 5500 is like pulling 40 watts stock and 65 if you turn pbo on and the 3060 is about 170 watts.

three_muffins three_muffins If your son is going down that competitive gaming streak my nephew and his friends are (similar ages) that system will play valorant,lol,overwatch,apex,csgo,r6,warzone well enough that it wont be hardware holding him back. As for storage he can get a usb hdd or ssd down the track, and if he wants another nvme ssd you could get a pcie card that has an nvme slot to put in the spare pcie slot on the board.
 

supernova8

Member
People on here are apparently really bad at suggesting PC parts.

The 600watt power supply is more than enough for that build.

Don't need a bigger m.2 drive, just get an ssd.

The build is probably more than enough for your son.

I would even say the 3060 is complete overkill if his son just wants to play esports stuff (like Valorant).


If he could wait a few more months, AMD will probably have a new set of APUs out that are even better than what the 680s can do (video above). He can get the money saved by (initially) not buying a GPU and use that for a good chunk of DDR5 RAM. Then maybe in a year or so, when his son has demonstrated this is not just a fad (let's face it 15 years old say they want the next shiniest thing and then drop it in 30 seconds), he can save up some money and get a dedicated GPU.

Hell, I'm still rocking my Ryzen 3400G and GTX1650, which is also totally fine for Valorant and similar games that don't really tax the system that much.

Of course it all depends on whether he wants/needs a system right now.
 

Rickyiez

Member
Go for the i5 12400f , it's the best price performance CPU to date . Also 1TB SSD is a no brainer because no reason not to get more space with the cheap SSD price . 650W PSU is definitely enough , and as far as budget goes , RTX3060 is the best choice I guess . Choosing Nvidia here over 6600xt because of DLSS . All these for $981 with a much better specs than the one posted in OP

PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: Intel Core i5-12400F 2.5 GHz 6-Core Processor ($164.99 @ Newegg)
CPU Cooler: ARCTIC Freezer 34 eSports DUO CPU Cooler ($51.97 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: ASRock B660M-HDV Micro ATX LGA1700 Motherboard ($94.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance LPX 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 CL16 Memory ($62.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: ADATA XPG SX8200 Pro 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive ($92.99 @ Amazon)
Video Card: MSI GeForce RTX 3060 12 GB VENTUS 2X Video Card ($379.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Fractal Design Focus G ATX Mid Tower Case ($65.98 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: EVGA SuperNOVA GA 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply ($67.27 @ Amazon)
Total: $981.17
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2022-06-29 00:01 EDT-0400
 
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supernova8

Member
Prebuilt is a good idea too. Imagine you’re the dad and you haven’t done it yourself and a fight happens when the kid can’t instantly run Steam before he installs the OS, GPU drivers, BIOS updates, and etc. Didnt put on the paste before you added the fan? Some dumb stuff like that could go either way. If I knew my child enjoyed learning and doing things on their own. That’s one thing. Kids don’t necessarily take pride in stuff like that. Only issue I have with prebuilds are those tacky neon lights they throw on everything gaming related.
Yeah I would never buy prebuilt (since I can build it myself) unless it was clearly a better option financially (which could be the case with all the crazy component pricing these days) but some people just don't want to mess around building it themselves. There's nothing wrong with that and any PC master race chad idiots saying otherwise can go suck a massive one.
 

baphomet

Member
I would even say the 3060 is complete overkill if his son just wants to play esports stuff (like Valorant).


If he could wait a few more months, AMD will probably have a new set of APUs out that are even better than what the 680s can do (video above). He can get the money saved by (initially) not buying a GPU and use that for a good chunk of DDR5 RAM. Then maybe in a year or so, when his son has demonstrated this is not just a fad (let's face it 15 years old say they want the next shiniest thing and then drop it in 30 seconds), he can save up some money and get a dedicated GPU.

Hell, I'm still rocking my Ryzen 3400G and GTX1650, which is also totally fine for Valorant and similar games that don't really tax the system that much.

Of course it all depends on whether he wants/needs a system right now.

I would say that is also a terrible suggestion.

DDR5 is completely useless in this situation. There's absolutely no reason to put money towards that in his son's rig.

A 3060 isn't overkill for anything.
 
What's your endgame here? But short answer, if my 15-year old son gave me that build, I'd buy it for him. It's decent, not too pricey, some things will need fixing but not right now. He can take it from there.

avin
I guess i will aim for a 1TB drive and change the 3060 to a ti version. At least i will suggest it to him and he has to decide if it is worth his money. :)

Thanks ot all the people in here with honest advice. It really helped a lot. :)
 

Tams

Gold Member
Prebuilt is a good idea too. Imagine you’re the dad and you haven’t done it yourself and a fight happens when the kid can’t instantly run Steam before he installs the OS, GPU drivers, BIOS updates, and etc. Didnt put on the paste before you added the fan? Some dumb stuff like that could go either way. If I knew my child enjoyed learning and doing things on their own. That’s one thing. Kids don’t necessarily take pride in stuff like that. Only issue I have with prebuilds are those tacky neon lights they throw on everything gaming related.
Then you'd be a shitty dad if your son or even you are that precious. And he'd need the entire thing taken away from him.

This kid has clearly asked or expects his dad to get him a gaming PC for him, as unsurprisingly he likely doesn't have the means to pay for it (not the money, the payment method).

OP would be a fool to waste this father-son bonding activity. And if the son builds it with his dad, then a) he very likely will treat it better amd appreciate it more and b) may well end up with a fond memory.

When I posted Terry Crews, I was only half memeing. The guy was acting as a great father.
 
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supernova8

Member
I would say that is also a terrible suggestion.

DDR5 is completely useless in this situation. There's absolutely no reason to put money towards that in his son's rig.

A 3060 isn't overkill for anything.
OK well I disagree.

He can add a 3060 later but he cannot migrate to DDR5 later without completely changing the mobo and CPU (assuming he goes with what he has).
 

supernova8

Member
Then you'd be a shitty dad if your son or even you are that precious. And he'd need the entire thing taken away from him.

This kid has clearly asked or expects his dad to get him a gaming PC for him, as unsurprisingly he likely doesn't have the means to pay for it (not the money, the payment method).

OP would be a fool to waste this father-son bonding activity. And if the son builds it with his dad, then a) he very likely will treat it better amd appreciate it more and b) may well end up with a fond memory.

When I posted Terry Crews, I was only half memeing. The guy was acting as a great father.

He made it fairly obvious he isn't planning to build it himself/with his son and yet you're trying to force the issue because you (for some reason beyond me) look down on people who buy prebuilds. Not sure what your problem is.
 
There is nothing wrong with buying prebuilds. If you like putting a PC together by yourself and save some money or get slightly better parts that is great. If you don't want the hassle just buy a prebuilt. Maybe look around a bit for reviews so you select a prebuilt that allows you to maybe add some storage or ram in the future. Some prebuilts really limit this option by using all sorts of proprietary parts.

The configuration posted in the OP seems to use standard parts which is great and when bought separately from the cheapest retailers in Germany you save about 90-100 euro.
 
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He made it fairly obvious he isn't planning to build it himself/with his son and yet you're trying to force the issue because you (for some reason beyond me) look down on people who buy prebuilds. Not sure what your problem is.
It's funny because nothing he said is inherently wrong all by itself. It's just his inability to see that other people might have different needs, not all kids are the same, or a myriad of other reasons why another family might go about it in a different way without it being due to the father being evil, misguided or neglective.
 
Buy him a switch, that'll show him.

Correct. Hardcore gaming has always been with the consoles. Switch is where it's at. SMT V and other excellent titles.

We all know PCMR is for the trash casuals.

Console FOR EVAAAAARRRRR.

Once your son starts up his own import LE DC collection than we can call him hardcore.

In fact you should buy him a modded DC instead. Far better than PC with God tier games. PSO even has fan servers and with KB Mouse config he won't even complain!
 

Tams

Gold Member
It's funny because nothing he said is inherently wrong all by itself. It's just his inability to see that other people might have different needs, not all kids are the same, or a myriad of other reasons why another family might go about it in a different way without it being due to the father being evil, misguided or neglective.
I never said OP was evil or neglective. Nor did I go 'PC massstterrrraccce - pre-builts are duuummmmmb!1!11!' (the gif btw, is the only one I could quickly find of Crews with his son). Don't put words in other people's mouths.

Misguided? Well, I didn't say that either, but perhaps. I merely said it's a big waste to not make it a project, especially when OP could save a few bucks and customise it. Why get a pre-built that doesn't quite fit what's wanted then?

I do get it. Not everyone likes building computers. But it's almost as simple as LEGO these days.

I brought up Terry Crews for a reason: he had no interest in PC gaming, but still built a PC with his son.
 
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baphomet

Member
OK well I disagree.

He can add a 3060 later but he cannot migrate to DDR5 later without completely changing the mobo and CPU (assuming he goes with what he has).

So he should tell his son instead of getting a gaming PC get one that doesnt play games, and if he still enjoys using his non-gaming PC in a few years he can put a graphics card in there?

That so he can get DDR5 for a +/- 1-2% differences in gaming? DDR5 runs worse than DDR4 in a lot of ESports games as well.
 

SmokedMeat

Gamer™
LMAO. Some legit terrible advice in here. 600W is plenty for a Ryzen and 3060.

Five years ago I’d say that’s fine. Now a 3070 requires a 650 watt PSU. Considering the rumors that new cards are going to be more power hungry I think going a little bigger on the PSU is sound advice.
This is the heart of your PC, and not something I’d want to have to go back and upgrade because I didn’t spend the extra few bucks the first time.
 
Then you'd be a shitty dad if your son or even you are that precious. And he'd need the entire thing taken away from him.

This kid has clearly asked or expects his dad to get him a gaming PC for him, as unsurprisingly he likely doesn't have the means to pay for it (not the money, the payment method).

OP would be a fool to waste this father-son bonding activity. And if the son builds it with his dad, then a) he very likely will treat it better amd appreciate it more and b) may well end up with a fond memory.

When I posted Terry Crews, I was only half memeing. The guy was acting as a great father.

I have a lot of quality time bonding activities with my son. We are on the shooting stand almost weekly and train on our olympic recurve bows. :) Besides that we go fishing together, because i know what im doing in those activities and actually have something to teach. :)
I also know my limits and those limits are building a pc. It is not my world, i dont know the first thing about it. So we get a prebuild. Today we will configure and order the pc together - thanks to the advice i got in here.

:)
 

baphomet

Member
Five years ago I’d say that’s fine. Now a 3070 requires a 650 watt PSU. Considering the rumors that new cards are going to be more power hungry I think going a little bigger on the PSU is sound advice.
This is the heart of your PC, and not something I’d want to have to go back and upgrade because I didn’t spend the extra few bucks the first time.

650 for a 3070?

Fucking not even remotely true.
 
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SmokedMeat

Gamer™

baphomet

Member
Then you don’t know what you’re talking about, and would risk fucking up your PC by being cheap.

The recommended power supply for a 3070 is 650 watts.

https://www.microcenter.com/product...cked-dual-fan-8gb-gddr6-pcie-40-graphics-card

https://www.newegg.com/gigabyte-geforce-rtx-3070-gv-n3070gaming-oc-8gd/p/N82E16814932449

Pick any 3070 you want - the answer isn’t going to change.

Lol, do you actually know how much power a 3070 can draw? Max you're looking at is less than 300.

In actual use cases you're looking at 250 on the high end.
 
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SmokedMeat

Gamer™
Lol, do you actually know how much power a 3070 can draw? Max you're looking at is less than 300.

In actual use cases you're looking at 250 on the high end.

Risk your PC then. I’ve been down that road and learned my lesson.

The PSU isn’t something you cheap out on. Ever.
 

Dream-Knife

Member
Five years ago I’d say that’s fine. Now a 3070 requires a 650 watt PSU. Considering the rumors that new cards are going to be more power hungry I think going a little bigger on the PSU is sound advice.
This is the heart of your PC, and not something I’d want to have to go back and upgrade because I didn’t spend the extra few bucks the first time.
A 3060 isn't a 3070.

The highest end 3070s don't consume more than 300w.

There's no such thing as future proofing. When he needs to replace that 3060, he'll likely need to replace the CPU, which means new everything.

I'm not saying to cheap out on the PSU, obviously buy a high quality PSU. But to claim he needs 750 or 850w for a 200w GPU and a 65w CPU is insane.
 
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STARSBarry

Gold Member
One thing no one seems to be mentioning here for some reason that this essentially all depends on the total power draw of the PC vs what the PSU is actually rated for
The Nvidia recommendation of 650 is based on an intel 10900k which a pretty power hungry processor that can draw 200-250 at full load, more than a 3070.

However what the PSU can actually produce in terms of Watts is determined by its rating from Standard to Titanium, with Gold being the most popular, but if you have a Bronze rating 600watt PSU for example, you can be looking at it really only being good for essentially around 500 watts due to efficiency meaning that if your system total goes above that its just going to black screen and cut off.

What Nivida is recommending is based on the highest end components vs the worst possible PSU preformance on the rating scale... this covers their ass if someone slaps in a 3070 with an unrated 550watt PSU and keeps getting black screens because he's running a full custom loop on a 10900k. It's covering their ass essentially, and I don't blame them.
 
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DonkeyPunchJr

World’s Biggest Weeb
A 3060 isn't a 3070.

The highest end 3070s don't consume more than 300w.

There's no such thing as future proofing. When he needs to replace that 3060, he'll likely need to replace the CPU, which means new everything.

I'm not saying to cheap out on the PSU, obviously buy a high quality PSU. But to claim he needs 750 or 850w for a 200w GPU and a 65w CPU is insane.
One thing to keep in mind is that most high-end power supplies nowadays come with a 10 year warranty. The PSU is the one component that is truly future proof and where it makes sense to go overkill with it.

Obviously depends on your budget though, whether you want to go with “good enough” vs “future proof”
 
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ACESHIGH

Member
Wall of text incoming but I recommend reading

That pc is good for now but.

Just put that money in a savings account and build it in late 2023. Proper next gen hasn't kicked in yet. All we can see now are PC GPUs running last gen games at high resolutions framerates and settings.

Also directstorage is not available yet on pc which should be a game changer.

Wait for next gen only games benchmarks to see what it takes to run games at performance at least slightly above consoles.

I built a mid range PC in late 2013 just as ps4 and Xbox one released. It could max all games at the time, but as proper next gen games like Batman Arkham knight and doom 2016 released I started to have performance issues related to GPU (VRAM was not enough to run the game with console quality textures, GPU architecture aged like milk) then some games started showing CPU limitations like modern assasins creed ones, Halo infinite or God of war.

If you want to build something now, my recommendation would be to put more money towards the CPU, PSU and memory. Get a cheap used GPU like an RX 570 as a placeholder. That should play all modern games at 1080p decent settings and it's a great card for multiplayer games like Fortnite, warzone, apex and more.

Get a proper next gen GPU next year as it is the easier part to replace.
 

hlm666

Member
One thing no one seems to be mentioning here for some reason that this essentially all depends on the total power draw of the PC vs what the PSU is actually rated for
The Nvidia recommendation of 650 is based on an intel 10900k which a pretty power hungry processor that can draw 200-250 at full load, more than a 3070.

However what the PSU can actually produce in terms of Watts is determined by its rating from Standard to Titanium, with Gold being the most popular, but if you have a Bronze rating 600watt PSU for example, you can be looking at it really only being good for essentially around 500 watts due to efficiency meaning that if your system total goes above that its just going to black screen and cut off.

What Nivida is recommending is based on the highest end components vs the worst possible PSU preformance on the rating scale... this covers their ass if someone slaps in a 3070 with an unrated 550watt PSU and keeps getting black screens because he's running a full custom loop on a 10900k. It's covering their ass essentially, and I don't blame them.
a psu should be able to supply the rated output, the efficiency rating lets you know how much energy your wasting to supply that rated wattage. If you buy a 600 wat psu and it only can supply 500 watts to your system it's faulty. The efficiency means it might need 550 watts from the wall to supply 500 to the system or 680 watts to supply 600 etc.
 

poppabk

Member
I have a lot of quality time bonding activities with my son. We are on the shooting stand almost weekly and train on our olympic recurve bows. :) Besides that we go fishing together, because i know what im doing in those activities and actually have something to teach. :)
I also know my limits and those limits are building a pc. It is not my world, i dont know the first thing about it. So we get a prebuild. Today we will configure and order the pc together - thanks to the advice i got in here.

:)
Honestly the best way to learn is with a pre-built and then upgrading stuff as you go.
 

The Cockatrice

Gold Member
https://outervision.com/power-supply-calculator

Problem solved. Don't buy a PSU just based on some recommendations. Always add at least 100W for future proof, especially if you decide to get a multimonitor setup(monitors have their own power, however once you reach that territory, he may want more GPu power and whatnot), more peripherals, more leds, etc. Never buy the minimum recommended. Upgrades can happen.
 
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BabyYoda

Member
You can get much better for the price if you build it yourself (or get your son to build it). A 500TB is not enough amd it's a mistake to go with a gen 3 SSD, a gen 4 SSD is better and I'd get a B560 motherboard instead to take advantage of higher cpu, SSD and ram speeds.

I'd recommend an Intel i5 11400f instead for a mid range PC, it's the best mid range value for money cpu you can get right now. The ram you chose is a fine speed for an 11th gen i5.

The PSU is fine, but if you want a huge gfx card upgrade one day, then you'll need more, otherwise it's more than enough. There are very cheap tower cases and coolers etc, I'll point you to what I got if you want.

That Gfx card is a 1080p-1440p card@60 fps (depending on the game), if you want 4K, then you need a more powerful option. But honestly, 4K if really overrated anyway. He'll be set with that.

Now if you get you're original choice, know you'll pay a couple hundred extra than building it yourself most likely.

But he'll be happy (unless he wants to play Cyberpunk 2077@4K with ultra settings and ray tracing!), he'll just be limited upgrade wise going forward, that's all.
 
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