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News Event Science James Webb space telescope (JWST) launch scheduled for 24th of December.

Will JWST successfully deploy in space?

  • Yes. Good chance it goes well.

    Votes: 91 75.2%
  • No. I think something will fail. (no way to fix)

    Votes: 11 9.1%
  • Shepard.

    Votes: 19 15.7%

  • Total voters
    121

SiteSeer

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The « do your own research » ? Really? No I don’t need to find some obscure geocities or 4chan conspiracy result from tHe GOOglE. I went far enough in engineering to know that you’re basically would take the worse possible tool (Hubble) for a job of observing earth. There’s no questions about it. Even someone with basics optics knowledge from entry level physics in college would understand how it doesn’t make any sense.

Turning spy satellites 180 degrees to observe the universe is just as bad of an idea as using Hubble like telescopes to spy down on Earth. It simply doesn’t work like that.

https://www.popularmechanics.com/sp...ns-turning-a-spy-satellite-into-a-new-hubble/

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smar...tellite-could-be-on-its-way-to-mars-62359114/

https://newatlas.com/spysatellite/22813/

https://www.americaspace.com/2012/0...revealed-by-nros-twin-telescope-gift-to-nasa/

two hubble-like spy satellites sitting in a warehouse finally gifted to nasa by nro when for years there were astronomers on waiting lists months long to use the one hst.
 

Aggelos

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Where are the aliens?

Probably you're gonna have to wait for ages for that to be answered. Maybe in the 21st century, with better science tools, more sophisticated telescopes, tons of money spent on SETI, and supercomputers to analyze data collected, scientists might be able to figure something out, whether there's evidence of intelligent extraterrestrial beings or not. But it probably won't be before this century is out.





"Italian-American physicist Enrico Fermi's name is associated with the paradox because of a casual conversation in the summer of 1950 with fellow physicists Edward Teller, Herbert York and Emil Konopinski. While walking to lunch, the men discussed recent UFO reports and the possibility of faster-than-light travel. The conversation moved on to other topics, until during lunch Fermi blurted out, "But where is everybody?" (although the exact quote is uncertain).
There have been many attempts to explain the Fermi paradox, primarily suggesting that intelligent extraterrestrial beings are extremely rare, that the lifetime of such civilizations is short, or that they exist but (for various reasons) humans see no evidence. This suggests that at universe time and space scales, two intelligent civilizations would be unlikely to ever meet, even if many developed during the life of the universe. "
 
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Diatribe1974

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About what kind of time frame are we looking at before we should legitimately be getting our first images back from it (once it reaches its destination)?
 

Stuart360

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I cant remember what star it is but i hope they take a look at that star that some scientists think a Dyson Sphere is literally being built around it.
Then again would they even tell us if they did find something?.
 
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Starfield

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E3 Starfield GIF by Xbox
 
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I cant remember what star it is but i hope they take a look at that star that some scientists think a Dyson Sphere is literally being built around it.
Then again would they even tell us if they did find something?.

If by "scientists" you mean "citizen scientists" then yeah sure. I haven't heard of a single legitimate scientist make the claim it could be a Dyson sphere though, a ring of dust or comet fragments are what has been tossed around as theories.

Though I agree, point the telescope there and see what's up.
 

IDKFA

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I cant remember what star it is but i hope they take a look at that star that some scientists think a Dyson Sphere is literally being built around it.
Then again would they even tell us if they did find something?.

It was confirmed during the launch livestream that they will be using the JWST to investigate Tabby's star and it's planets.

I wouldn't expect a Dyson sphere or any other giant alien creation. I'm pretty sure that theory has already been ruled out.
 
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greyshark

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After a successful launch of NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope Dec. 25, and completion of two mid-course correction maneuvers, the Webb team has analyzed its initial trajectory and determined the observatory should have enough propellant to allow support of science operations in orbit for significantly more than a 10-year science lifetime. (The minimum baseline for the mission is five years.)

The analysis shows that less propellant than originally planned for is needed to correct Webb’s trajectory toward its final orbit around the second Lagrange point known as L2, a point of gravitational balance on the far side of Earth away from the Sun. Consequently, Webb will have much more than the baseline estimate of propellant – though many factors could ultimately affect Webb’s duration of operation.

Great news!
 

Migu

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Thank you for this thread! I don't know how I managed to know nothing of this project until last week... when I first read about this project and its gigantic cost and having over 300 single points of failure, it seemed like a person betting his house on a horse race... madness. However, upon watching the documentary I started to understand the scientists are doing the most to eliminate risks as much as possible. So, crazy and risky project? Sure. But the possibilities of further space discoveries if the telescope arrives where it's supposed to... respect to anyone who contributed to this project, and I hope everything keeps going as smooth!

Watched the launch on the 24th, amazing experience. I keep track of the progress thanks to the "Where is Webb?" website - temperature readings are available now! It's like Nasa states on its Twitter account - a flower blooming slowly. It sure has kindled my interest in astronomy. Next days are going to be tense!
 

haxan7

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Thank you for this thread! I don't know how I managed to know nothing of this project until last week... when I first read about this project and its gigantic cost and having over 300 single points of failure, it seemed like a person betting his house on a horse race... madness. However, upon watching the documentary I started to understand the scientists are doing the most to eliminate risks as much as possible. So, crazy and risky project? Sure. But the possibilities of further space discoveries if the telescope arrives where it's supposed to... respect to anyone who contributed to this project, and I hope everything keeps going as smooth!

Watched the launch on the 24th, amazing experience. I keep track of the progress thanks to the "Where is Webb?" website - temperature readings are available now! It's like Nasa states on its Twitter account - a flower blooming slowly. It sure has kindled my interest in astronomy. Next days are going to be tense!
Where is Webb is a great tool, have been checking it daily.

I don't quite understand the line graph. Distance wise, the tool says Webb has already completed 39% of its journey. But the line graph makes it look like it's still far away from L2. Is it going to slow way down?
 

greyshark

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Where is Webb is a great tool, have been checking it daily.

I don't quite understand the line graph. Distance wise, the tool says Webb has already completed 39% of its journey. But the line graph makes it look like it's still far away from L2. Is it going to slow way down?

It’s time based - each notch is a day in its 29 day journey. I think it’s would have been better to show distance instead.
 
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10 year service? that doesn't seem long. it's taken decades and billions of $ to get it into space and it's only gonna last until 2031? hopefully they can find out a way to get more propellant to it and extend its service.
 
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Read the posts a few up. Gonna last longer than 10 years now
how much longer?

hubble has been going for 31 years and could last another 10-20 years. or maybe JWST is gonna now be able to do 30-40 years more? (doubt).

i know JWST is further away and is pretty much impossible for humans to service it. we need to work on a way to extend its life or are we gonna just start work on a new telescope?
 
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Coolwhhip

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how much longer?

hubble has been going for 31 years and could last another 10-20 years. or maybe JWST is gonna now be able to do 30-40 years more? (doubt).

i know JWST is further away and is pretty much impossible for humans to service it. we need to work on a way to extend its life or are we gonna just start work on a new telescope?

One of the scientists working on it said we will send people to L2 eventually because that spot if very important. But for JW it would be too late for service, more as archaeology.
 

greyshark

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how much longer?

hubble has been going for 31 years and could last another 10-20 years. or maybe JWST is gonna now be able to do 30-40 years more? (doubt).

i know JWST is further away and is pretty much impossible for humans to service it. we need to work on a way to extend its life or are we gonna just start work on a new telescope?

They’ll do everything they can to extend the life of the telescope. Hubble was only supposed to last 15 years (even with servicing), Voyager was only supposed to last for 4 years.
 
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They’ll do everything they can to extend the life of the telescope. Hubble was only supposed to last 15 years (even with servicing), Voyager was only supposed to last for 4 years.
They're going to discover so much new shit with Webb that 10 years won't be enough.
They're absolutely going to be refueling Webb somehow.
 

Rentahamster

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i know JWST is further away and is pretty much impossible for humans to service it. we need to work on a way to extend its life or are we gonna just start work on a new telescope?
By the time it needs to be serviced, we'll have figured something out. We're good at figuring stuff out on a long time scale.
 

Rentahamster

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You sure about that? It will need servicing in 10 years or less. In order to get to it, we'd have to go 4x further than we've ever sent anyone
I'm not 100% sure because I don't know the future, but I'm confident. My reasons are because they now know they have longer than 10 years. Our technology is also increasing at a very rapid pace, with our robotics getting ever more advanced. I also anticipate that the the discoveries we make with the JWT will give us even more motivation to find a solution to extend its lifespan.
 
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haxan7

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I'm not 100% sure because I don't know the future, but I'm confident. My reasons are because they now know they have longer than 10 years. Our technology is also increasing at a very rapid pace, with our robotics getting ever more advanced. I also anticipate that the the discoveries we make with the JWT will give us even more motivation to find a solution to extend its lifespan.
A few of the videos I watched mentioned nebulous rumors about NASA developing tech to refuel the telescope. With commercial space travel making so much progress now, I can see it becoming a possibility they would work something out. Of course that's just speculation.
 

MastaKiiLA

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A few of the videos I watched mentioned nebulous rumors about NASA developing tech to refuel the telescope. With commercial space travel making so much progress now, I can see it becoming a possibility they would work something out. Of course that's just speculation.
I'm guessing they'll send a service module out there that will just latch on at the back with an engine and more fuels. I'm not sure they put a dock on there for refueling. Any service module we send will probably be refuelable, to allow for future extensions of service. That's just my guess though. I was hoping they'd have put an ion drive on there, like those asteroid probes use. Maybe not enough delta-V for station-keeping when compared to liquid-fuel?
 
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MastaKiiLA

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One of the scientists working on it said we will send people to L2 eventually because that spot if very important. But for JW it would be too late for service, more as archaeology.
I wonder why L2 would be important for human flights. I think a Mars (Aldrin) cycler would be the most-important, since it could drastically reduce fuel costs for Mars insertion long-term.
 
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Coolwhhip

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I wonder why L2 would be important for human flights. I think a Mars cycler would be the most-important, since it could drastically reduce fuel costs for Mars insertion long-term.

They would send people there to do service, because a lot more telescopes will be there in the future.
 
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Portugeezer

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Just because you're a moron who doesn't know who he is doesn't mean that he's not important.
To be fair, I only know his name from the telescope. But that is also the point of the name I guess, to give recognition to someone who people may not have known, otherwise we should just name everything after Einstein and Hawking.
 
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FutureMD

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Am I the only one not at all worried about the deployment? I'd imagine with the current tech and decades of design and testing, it'd be embarrassing to have it fail. It's a great achievement for sure, but a lot of people seem to think there's a good chance of failing, which I find hard to believe.
 

Coolwhhip

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Am I the only one not at all worried about the deployment? I'd imagine with the current tech and decades of design and testing, it'd be embarrassing to have it fail. It's a great achievement for sure, but a lot of people seem to think there's a good chance of failing, which I find hard to believe.

The Hubble failed and had to be fixed. This is peak human technology, of course it can fail.
 
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RJMacready73

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Am I the only one not at all worried about the deployment? I'd imagine with the current tech and decades of design and testing, it'd be embarrassing to have it fail. It's a great achievement for sure, but a lot of people seem to think there's a good chance of failing, which I find hard to believe.
I'm worried af tbh, humans are human and no matter how many times we check and recheck this thing is still an incredibly complex piece of engineering that was launched on a rocket and is now hurtling through space, shit can just go wrong but so far so good.. roll on the next stage