Social Media Karens at it again - demanding trigger warnings for House of Dragons!!

cormack12

Gold Member
Source: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/newsbeat-62652449

A record-breaking 10 million fans watched the House of the Dragon premiere, which contained a graphic scene called "triggering" by many people on social media.

In the episode, actor Paddy Considine's King Viserys orders a caesarean section to be performed on his wife Aemma Arryn - played by Sian Brooke - while she is conscious which kills both her and the baby.

Director Miguel Sapochnik told journalists his team asked "as many women as possible" if the birthing scene was too violent before they decided to keep it in.
But charities and some people who watched the show think there should be a trigger warning to let people know the gruesome scene is coming up.

Creator of trigger spoiler website Doesthedogdie.com, John Whipple, says he had forums warning viewers about the graphic scene.

He admits that "many trigger warnings on the site are very specific and don't apply to most people".

But he says: "On the other hand, everyone has something in their past they don't want to relive.

"Having prior knowledge going into a movie puts users back in control of how they experience entertainment."

He thinks streaming services should try "tailor the warnings to each user, possibly even recommending what to watch based on a user's specific triggers".
 

jufonuk

not tag worthy
father ted GIF by Pixel Bandits
 

Nobody_Important

“Aww, it’s so...average,” she said to him in a cold brick of passion
A dude got his dick chopped off, a man got his face caved in with an axe, and multiple people had limbs forcefully amputated. All with full gore. We literally saw the chopped off dick. We watched the guys hand flop off onto the ground.


But yeah the birth scene where there was just a lot of screaming and a lot of blood was the one that went too far.


Okay. 🙄
 

Nobody_Important

“Aww, it’s so...average,” she said to him in a cold brick of passion
The scene was gore for gore's sake. I fast forwarded through it and missed nothing.
It wasn't though. Her death is straight from the books. There were also key points made there that sets up plot points for the rest of the episode.

Specifically the baby's name and the Kings guilt leading to the rushed decision about Rhaenyra.
 
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HoodWinked

Member
This is so fucking stupid.

whether intentional or unintentional the writers did a good job leading up to the scene to let viewers know it was coming and even priming it with incredibly graphic violence beforehand. It wasn't some kind of jump scare.

maybe this is some kind of psiops marketing to let people know that its graphic to entice people to watch it. "if Karen hates it then it must be good"
 
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IDKFA

Gold Member
I'm seeing more and more calls for entertainment to come with trigger warnings. Many universities in the UK are adding trigger warnings to classic literature to avoid students getting upset or offended.

It's all so fucking tiresome. What's next? Calls to ban certain works of art or entertainment because they don't stand up to modern sensibilities?
 

Tieno

Member
The trigger warning is in the title of the show.
exactly. The Game of Thrones is known for this kind of stuff. HBO is adult content.
If people want a safe space then watch some disney+ show.

Some people want to be accommodated in fuckin everything.

I'm kinda glad the first ep of HOTD set the tone from the start.
 
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Soodanim

Member
It's a shame the BBC is willing to publish pieces giving a greater voice to the sort of people who would have once upon a time written letters or made calls of complaint to the BBC that were heard or seen by no one except people that read the logs to laugh at them.

By putting these out the BBC pretends that these nonsensical, irrational voices are worth hearing and that they may have a point, and are more than just the ramblings of people that you wouldn't stop to listen to if they said it on the street.
 
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kruis

Exposing the sinister cartel of retailers who allow companies to pay for advertising space.
Here's a tip: if the on screen visuals are too much to handle, close your eyes or look the other way. Or simply don't watch that movie or tv show.
 

jufonuk

not tag worthy
A dude got his dick chopped off, a man got his face caved in with an axe, and multiple people had limbs forcefully amputated. All with full gore. We literally saw the chopped off dick. We watched the guys hand flop off onto the ground.


But yeah the birth scene where there was just a lot of screaming and a lot of blood was the one that went too far.


Okay. 🙄
I like the joust going mental and the poor kid throwing up in the background made me laugh my head off
 
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DKehoe

Member
On one hand I do get that something like childbirth can be traumatic under certain circumstances and having a reminder of that experience sprung on you could be difficult. But I don't want to get a heads up before I start watching something listing everything I'm about to see. There are sites like the one mentioned in the article that people can use to get a forewarning of what's to come in something. So these services do already exist for people who want to seek that out.

Also, when you read the article it's basically just one person talking about their reaction. News outlets need to stop treating a few people on Twitter being upset as a news story.
 

NickFire

Member
News outlets need to stop treating a few people on Twitter being upset as a news story.
Some news outlet will read this part of your post and take it to heart. Unfortunately, all that means is the next story will be based on anonymous sources who were triggered by things.

:messenger_tears_of_joy:
 

Hari Seldon

Gold Member
It wasn't though. Her death is straight from the books. There were also key points made there that sets up plot points for the rest of the episode.

Specifically the baby's name and the Kings guilt leading to the rushed decision about Rhaenyra.
My point is that you could have done it without all the gore. A typical way to do this would be to have a scene of the bloody aftermath without the gory play-by-play. I dunno, maybe as i get older I have less tolerance for this shit and will simply skip it or stop watching if it continues.

Gore for gore's sake is sloppy lazy filmaking period.
 
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Also, when you read the article it's basically just one person talking about their reaction. News outlets need to stop treating a few people on Twitter being upset as a news story.
Controversy gets you clicks, and it has infected every form of social media including this forum.
 

DKehoe

Member
My point is that you could have done it without all the gore. A typical way to do this would be to have a scene of the bloody aftermath without the gory play-by-play. I dunno, maybe as i get older I have less tolerance for this shit and will simply skip it or stop watching if it continues.

Gore for gore's sake is sloppy lazy filmaking period.
It is meant to be traumatic though. I get not wanting edgelord shit just for the sake of it. But we're meant to watch him have to make this awful decision, see the consequences and then live with the result. The power structure he has grown up within and is part of made that happen.
 

Hari Seldon

Gold Member
It is meant to be traumatic though. I get not wanting edgelord shit just for the sake of it. But we're meant to watch him have to make this awful decision, see the consequences and then live with the result. The power structure he has grown up within and is part of made that happen.
Perhaps then it should be done a few episodes in when non-book readers care about the character dying. The scene had no weight for me because I didn't give a shit about the character dying who had like 10 lines total. They tried to add emotional weight by adding gore instead of making you care about the character.
 

DKehoe

Member
Perhaps then it should be done a few episodes in when non-book readers care about the character dying. The scene had no weight for me because I didn't give a shit about the character dying who had like 10 lines total. They tried to add emotional weight by adding gore instead of making you care about the character.
I get what you mean. It would have been nice if we'd been allowed to be a bit more invested in her as a character and their relationship. But the problem is that happens really early in the story and is one of the events that kicks the plot into gear. We're really early in the timeline of what's to come. So taking time to set up something like that is really going to drag your pacing down. I guess perhaps that's why you need to make the scene an uncomfortable watch. Because maybe I don't know much about these two people but I can immediately get how horrible that was to go through.
 

Nobody_Important

“Aww, it’s so...average,” she said to him in a cold brick of passion
My point is that you could have done it without all the gore. A typical way to do this would be to have a scene of the bloody aftermath without the gory play-by-play. I dunno, maybe as i get older I have less tolerance for this shit and will simply skip it or stop watching if it continues.

Gore for gore's sake is sloppy lazy filmaking period.
Are you new to Game of Thrones? lol
 

MastaKiiLA

Member
Source: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/newsbeat-62652449

A record-breaking 10 million fans watched the House of the Dragon premiere, which contained a graphic scene called "triggering" by many people on social media.

In the episode, actor Paddy Considine's King Viserys orders a caesarean section to be performed on his wife Aemma Arryn - played by Sian Brooke - while she is conscious which kills both her and the baby.

Director Miguel Sapochnik told journalists his team asked "as many women as possible" if the birthing scene was too violent before they decided to keep it in.
But charities and some people who watched the show think there should be a trigger warning to let people know the gruesome scene is coming up.

Creator of trigger spoiler website Doesthedogdie.com, John Whipple, says he had forums warning viewers about the graphic scene.

He admits that "many trigger warnings on the site are very specific and don't apply to most people".

But he says: "On the other hand, everyone has something in their past they don't want to relive.

"Having prior knowledge going into a movie puts users back in control of how they experience entertainment."

He thinks streaming services should try "tailor the warnings to each user, possibly even recommending what to watch based on a user's specific triggers".
Just add fucking filters. Porn sites have been employing them for years. Streaming services can as well. Just toggle the "I'm a huge fucking pussy" option, and the app will protect you from the scary fiction.
 

lachesis

Gold Member
I was wondering what "caesarean section" meant.
Now I know what that C means in C section. I originally thought it's called C section because maybe they do C-shaped cuts?
(Well, at least it's not the other C word!)

.. I always learn something new from GAF. :)
 

Mr Hyde

Gold Member
I've only seen one film that actually included a trigger warning before a scene - and that's the french film "Seul contre tous" or "I stand alone" by famed provocateur Gaspar Noe. It released in 1998, way before this social media nonsense was happening, so when I saw the movie, it felt pretty innovative because I didn't expect it (and the scene that Noe warns us about is pretty gruesome). But if it would happen in a mainstream show from HBO or some other network, because people today are so fragile, I would lose faith in humanity and stop watching that show.
 
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EviLore

Expansive Ellipses
Staff Member
I was wondering what "caesarean section" meant.
Now I know what that C means in C section. I originally thought it's called C section because maybe they do C-shaped cuts?
(Well, at least it's not the other C word!)

.. I always learn something new from GAF. :)
The etymology is complicated:


"
The Roman Lex Regia (royal law), later the Lex Caesarea (imperial law), of Numa Pompilius (715–673 BC),[136] required the child of a mother who had died during childbirth to be cut from her womb.[137] There was a cultural taboo that mothers should not be buried pregnant,[138] that may have reflected a way of saving some fetuses. Roman practice required a living mother to be in her tenth month of pregnancy before resorting to the procedure, reflecting the knowledge that she could not survive the delivery.[139]

Speculations that the Roman dictator Julius Caesar was born by the method now known as C-section are false.[140] Although caesarean sections were performed in Roman times, no classical source records a mother surviving such a delivery.[137][141] As late as the 12th century, scholar and physician Maimonides expresses doubt over the possibility of a woman's surviving this procedure and again becoming pregnant.[142] The term has also been explained as deriving from the verb caedere, "to cut", with children delivered this way referred to as caesones. Pliny the Elder refers to a certain Julius Caesar (an ancestor of the famous Roman statesman) as ab utero caeso, "cut from the womb" giving this as an explanation for the cognomen "Caesar" which was then carried by his descendants.[137] Nonetheless, the false etymology has been widely repeated until recently. For example, the first (1888) and second (1989) editions of the Oxford English Dictionary say that caesarean birth "was done in the case of Julius Cæsar".[143] More recent dictionaries are more diffident: the online edition of the OED (2021) mentions "the traditional belief that Julius Cæsar was delivered this way",[144] and Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary (2003) says "from the legendary association of such a delivery with the Roman cognomen Caesar".[145]

The word 'Caesar', meaning either Julius Caesar or an emperor in general, is also borrowed or calqued in the name of the procedure in many other languages in Europe and beyond.[146]

Finally, the Roman praenomen (given name) Caeso was said to be given to children who were born via C-section. While this was probably just folk etymology made popular by Pliny the Elder, it was well known by the time the term came into common use.[147]
"
 
PTSD is a real thing as are PTSD "triggers."

But we can't really expect TV shows to give us some list of possible triggers as they often can't even be guessed... and I can't help but think many complaining don't actually have PTSD or anything close to it.

Either way it's a "you" problem, and you need to deal with it yourself, as it's unrealistic to avoid triggers to your PTSD.

But I also think some of you could have a bit more empathy towards PTSD sufferers.
 
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VN1X

Member
I'm amazed that people are actually watching this after the dumpster fire of the last two seasons of GoT; basically rendering the entirety of the series as a waste of time.

Perhaps this'll fare better but I sure as shit ain't jumping on at the start and will instead wait until it's finished.
 

lachesis

Gold Member
The etymology is complicated:

[/URL]

"
The Roman Lex Regia (royal law), later the Lex Caesarea (imperial law), of Numa Pompilius (715–673 BC),[136] required the child of a mother who had died during childbirth to be cut from her womb.[137] There was a cultural taboo that mothers should not be buried pregnant,[138] that may have reflected a way of saving some fetuses. Roman practice required a living mother to be in her tenth month of pregnancy before resorting to the procedure, reflecting the knowledge that she could not survive the delivery.[139]

Speculations that the Roman dictator Julius Caesar was born by the method now known as C-section are false.[140] Although caesarean sections were performed in Roman times, no classical source records a mother surviving such a delivery.[137][141] As late as the 12th century, scholar and physician Maimonides expresses doubt over the possibility of a woman's surviving this procedure and again becoming pregnant.[142] The term has also been explained as deriving from the verb caedere, "to cut", with children delivered this way referred to as caesones. Pliny the Elder refers to a certain Julius Caesar (an ancestor of the famous Roman statesman) as ab utero caeso, "cut from the womb" giving this as an explanation for the cognomen "Caesar" which was then carried by his descendants.[137] Nonetheless, the false etymology has been widely repeated until recently. For example, the first (1888) and second (1989) editions of the Oxford English Dictionary say that caesarean birth "was done in the case of Julius Cæsar".[143] More recent dictionaries are more diffident: the online edition of the OED (2021) mentions "the traditional belief that Julius Cæsar was delivered this way",[144] and Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary (2003) says "from the legendary association of such a delivery with the Roman cognomen Caesar".[145]

The word 'Caesar', meaning either Julius Caesar or an emperor in general, is also borrowed or calqued in the name of the procedure in many other languages in Europe and beyond.[146]

Finally, the Roman praenomen (given name) Caeso was said to be given to children who were born via C-section. While this was probably just folk etymology made popular by Pliny the Elder, it was well known by the time the term came into common use.[147]
"
Interesting read! Thank you.

I honestly didn't know that performing of C-section went as far as Roman age.
Perhaps my own skepticism & reading about horrors of old primitive (un sanitized) medicine practices is making me think like that.
 
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