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The biggest hurdle for VR! Lets look at the most successful device the Quest 2.

Gamer79

Predicts the worst decade for Sony starting 2022
I have owned a quest since Xmas of 2021. I will say that it is a neat device and will keep people entertained for a few months with it's game library. After say 3-6 months you will run into a snag that I and my buddies have run into. The software overall quality is lacking.

I am not saying there are not good quality games on the quest platform. Resident Evil 4 VR, Super Hot, Beat Saber, and a handful of other games are really great experiences to be had in VR. The issue is the vast majority of the quest platform is made up of what can be summed up as Wii Shovelware type of games. Mostly indie small developers who don't have the resources to make top notch games are the main publisher of quest VR games. I did not do the math but I would say a ratio of 25:1 meaning the 1 is made from a bigger publishing house makes up the quest library. Simply put, one gets bored. This extends to the pc market as well.

To be blunt, big name publishers are not dedicating resources to VR games on a consistent basis. I don't know if VR across all platforms has a library that will push it to become main stream. The Quest 2 has flirted with mainstream but it's not in the same ballpark as main consoles from a sales perspective.
 

ABnormal

Member
It's absolutely true that the software is in general lacking, but that's a given in the current situation. We are still far from havong an installed base that can justify big investments, and there is not yet a standard set of controllers that could allow building games around that hardware.
It's a matter of technological advancement, on the side of performance and size reduction. It will take a while, but it's inevitable.

The very first hurdle for VR is motion sickness, which stops the most from playing (me too, who would jump in VR gaming entirely, can't yet do it due to it). The first producer that will solve, in a way or another, the problem of motion sickness, will allow such freedom in movement, gameplay and game design, that NOBODY, literally nobody, will be able to go back to the usual constraints, once experienced the true possibilities of VR.
 

Guerilla Munch

Neo Member
I've had some good times with my VR headsets over the years, but since I've had my kid I haven't been able to touch my Quest 2.

I can fire up one of my consoles while my daughter plays with Lego or something, but I can't use VR because it's like leaving her alone. Same thing if my girlfriend and I are chilling on the couch at the end of the day. If I put on a VR headset it's like I've left the house.
 

Danknugz

Member
It's absolutely true that the software is in general lacking, but that's a given in the current situation. We are still far from havong an installed base that can justify big investments, and there is not yet a standard set of controllers that could allow building games around that hardware.
It's a matter of technological advancement, on the side of performance and size reduction. It will take a while, but it's inevitable.

The very first hurdle for VR is motion sickness, which stops the most from playing (me too, who would jump in VR gaming entirely, can't yet do it due to it). The first producer that will solve, in a way or another, the problem of motion sickness, will allow such freedom in movement, gameplay and game design, that NOBODY, literally nobody, will be able to go back to the usual constraints, once experienced the true possibilities of VR.
motion sickness is by far the biggest hurdle facing VR. even the most hardcore VR evangelists have been sidelined by it, it's the elephant in the room. personally i had to find a custom routine to acclimate myself and it took a month or two, i had a method where i would blink my eyes fast every time i traversed an elevation change or ran fast in a way that i knew would lead to me getting sick. eventually i had to blink them less and less until i didn't have to at all anymore. it probably took me 1-2 months (about the same time it took me to learn to ollie on a skateboard). i also was playing onward so there was kind of competitive aspect that kept my desire high to overcome it, so i wouldn't be at a disadvantage.

the good thing is that it kind of stays once you get used to it. now, since i barely have time to play, when i do play, i still kind of get it but it goes away much quicker. it is kind of like riding a bike i guess if you've trained your brain to it.

but the point is most people aren't willing to put in that effort, most just want that instant gratification. especially when they're used to their CoDs and battle royales in 2D with comfy couch and no weird social implications when they have partners/roommates/family. i would imagine it's also less of motivation when you're just playing single player and you arnent losing matches and getting trash talked on by little kids.
 

darthvargi

Member
I totally get where you're coming from and honestly sometimes it concerns me that the games I recommend are usually years old.

That said if you're willing to try lesser known games VR is a goldmine of indie gems that you continue to get updated and are fun for years.

Just a few examples:

1. 2MD VR Football
2. Walkabout Mini golf
3. Golf+
4. Eleven Table Tennis
5. Contractors
6. Blaston
7. Pistol Whip
8. Ultrawings 2
9. Moss Books 1&2
10. Ven Adventure
11. Premium Bowling


I think the issue is most people only try a few popular games like Superhot, HL Alyx, Beat Saber, and Pavlov and say that's it. There are tons of really amazing games and truly full experiences like Chronos or Asgard's Wrath that most people haven't even tried.

Does it need AAA to survive long term, yes. It needs more titles now but it seems like the investment has to be entirely funded by Meta, Sony, or Valve and I just don't see that being viable long term. I love VR and it's the most exciting thing gaming wise to come out in my opinion since 3D Accelerators but it somehow has to gain traction and retain its audience.

I'm crazy and like a ton of games so I'm happy playing arcade like games such as Crisis VRgade which mirrors Time Crisis or golfing 18 holes in Golf+ for years off and on but many people want to play the yearly COD or FIFA release and as of today you won't find that in VR.
 

hlm666

Member
It might get better now they have essentially dropped doing pcvr. Going forward you wont have things like lone echo 2 being made so that might mean more things like res evil 4, by that i mean larger budget games focused on the quest. Or they might totally pull back on big budget games all together and focus on social uses, see what happens I guess.

All I know is ACC, Flight Sim and Alyx ruin VR. Once you have been there it's hard to lower your expectations.
 
Been playing a bit of Into the Radius and it's pretty cool, kinda like Stalker but in VR.

I love VR games where I can shoot bolt action rifles and pump action shotguns, there's something very satisfying in it.
 

Sorcerer

Member
Is there such a thing as online multiplayer with these headsets? I would think lack of that is one of the bigger issues killing VR.
 
Going by Firewall: Zero Hour, Sony has the best chance to push VR for mainstream with COD MW2.

That'll be the first major title supporting VR that could become a big hit.
 
I totally get where you're coming from and honestly sometimes it concerns me that the games I recommend are usually years old.

That said if you're willing to try lesser known games VR is a goldmine of indie gems that you continue to get updated and are fun for years.

Just a few examples:

1. 2MD VR Football
2. Walkabout Mini golf
3. Golf+
4. Eleven Table Tennis
5. Contractors
6. Blaston
7. Pistol Whip
8. Ultrawings 2
9. Moss Books 1&2
10. Ven Adventure
11. Premium Bowling


I think the issue is most people only try a few popular games like Superhot, HL Alyx, Beat Saber, and Pavlov and say that's it. There are tons of really amazing games and truly full experiences like Chronos or Asgard's Wrath that most people haven't even tried.

Does it need AAA to survive long term, yes. It needs more titles now but it seems like the investment has to be entirely funded by Meta, Sony, or Valve and I just don't see that being viable long term. I love VR and it's the most exciting thing gaming wise to come out in my opinion since 3D Accelerators but it somehow has to gain traction and retain its audience.

I'm crazy and like a ton of games so I'm happy playing arcade like games such as Crisis VRgade which mirrors Time Crisis or golfing 18 holes in Golf+ for years off and on but many people want to play the yearly COD or FIFA release and as of today you won't find that in VR.
Walk about mini golf is so good. One of my favorites
Is there such a thing as online multiplayer with these headsets? I would think lack of that is one of the bigger issues killing VR.

Of course there are. I've seen some MMOs, and Pavlov is basically Counter Strike in VR, which is as cool as it sounds.
Pavlov has cod zombies and it's perfect. It also has Halo maps with Halo weapons and warthogs to drive. Amazing. The civil war maps are super fun as well. Pavlov has something for everyone.
 

Rudius

Member
In the ideal world we would have a lot of made for VR AAA games, but given the small user base the best we can hope for is a lot of hybrid VR games, that being games that are playable both in flat and VR. Capcom is doing this with the main line Resident Evil series, but the same approach could work for all first person and all vehicle games, like shooters, first person RPGs and racing games. That already gives you a large library of titles that can be complemented by a few high profile VR exclusives per year that really push the technology, 2 or 3 may be enough. I believe that is Sony's strategy for the PSVR2.
 
It's absolutely true that the software is in general lacking, but that's a given in the current situation. We are still far from havong an installed base that can justify big investments, and there is not yet a standard set of controllers that could allow building games around that hardware.
It's a matter of technological advancement, on the side of performance and size reduction. It will take a while, but it's inevitable.

The very first hurdle for VR is motion sickness, which stops the most from playing (me too, who would jump in VR gaming entirely, can't yet do it due to it). The first producer that will solve, in a way or another, the problem of motion sickness, will allow such freedom in movement, gameplay and game design, that NOBODY, literally nobody, will be able to go back to the usual constraints, once experienced the true possibilities of VR.
I suffer greatly from motion sickness, but a HMD with a wide fov and near perfect tracking and 120fps really made it a non issue quite quickly.
 

poppabk

Member
If this was the case then mobile gaming would be on life support - instead apple is bigger than MS, Sony and Nintendo combined in gaming, and they don't make a single game.
The problem for VR is that it is for most people a short burst kind of thing. So a new type of AAA game needs to be developed, with triple AAA production values but which is meant to be played in 20 - 60 minute chunks.
 
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