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Will Nintendo Switch reach the sales of the Sony PS2?

Will the Nintendo Switch reach the sales of the Sony PS2?

  • Yes

    Votes: 127 58.0%
  • No

    Votes: 92 42.0%

  • Total voters
    219

MarkMe2525

Member
It's adoption you aren't considering, the likely hood of someone using company, or purchasing a retailer protection plan, was less likely to be done with a PS1 or N64, or eve a $700 3DO at launch, Xbox, or PS2, than a 360, PS3, Switch, so on. It's not that they didn't exist, but they weren't ass accessible, there weren't as many options, and people didn't think they needed to use them.

This is the same for Smartphones, which have people using protection plans and warranties more now than before 2012. The likely hood of someone rebuying a PS2 or Xbox was higher, than a 360/Switch where a warranty or protection plan would be attached. I would say for gaming consoles the 360/PS3 was the ones that really got more consumers to consider warranties.
I'm sorry but you're way off here. Protection plans were just as easy to obtain and became prolific in the mid to late 80's around the time "planned obsolescence" became a household word. This "planned obsolescence" used to be a reoccurring topic on evening news for years and was on the minds of many many customers. Retailers capatilzed with the extended warranty product. I have no issue with a point based off of an assumption, but this is just revisionist history to make the assertion that people "didn't think they needed to use them" more today than they did in the past.

Yes, there are more options to choose from, but that does not mean more customers are purchasing these products for their electronics. It just means that the 10-15% of people who historically even consider purchasing these products make up a pie that is split between many different companies now.
 

Eddie-Griffin

Gold Member
I'm sorry but you're way off here. Protection plans were just as easy to obtain and became prolific in the mid to late 80's around the time "planned obsolescence" became a household word.

Not for gaming consoles, you're conflating categories. people were not often getting protection plans for their games. there were also less choices and retailer plans, what where of them, were not adopted at stores that had them. If you read articles around the time of RROD worsening and reaching it's best coverage you can even read about people being surprised about needing warranties for a game consoles, and this would apply to the PS3 too but not the same extent obviously.

The point you're missing is that, during the PS2 people were more likely to rebuy a PS2, post that gen until now, people are more likely to buy cases, or warranty extensions, or other protection plans for their devices, especially portable devices/tablets. The Switch would fit into that areas as well as a higher adoption of protection plans for consoles in general from back then.

So the dismissal earlier to try and comapre the Switch replacements with PS2 replacements doesn't really work.
 

MarkMe2525

Member
Not for gaming consoles, you're conflating categories. people were not often getting protection plans for their games. there were also less choices and retailer plans, what where of them, were not adopted at stores that had them. If you read articles around the time of RROD worsening and reaching it's best coverage you can even read about people being surprised about needing warranties for a game consoles, and this would apply to the PS3 too but not the same extent obviously.

The point you're missing is that, during the PS2 people were more likely to rebuy a PS2, post that gen until now, people are more likely to buy cases, or warranty extensions, or other protection plans for their devices, especially portable devices/tablets. The Switch would fit into that areas as well as a higher adoption of protection plans for consoles in general from back then.

So the dismissal earlier to try and comapre the Switch replacements with PS2 replacements doesn't really work.
I'm not confusing the categories. Gaming console protection plans were being pushed by electronic retailers before and during the release of PS2. 2001 when I got my first Xbox from circuit city, the sales guy almost made it seem like we couldn't buy it without a protection plan. They pushed hard... probably too hard. Then when I started there in the summer of 2004, it was expected that we attach 15% to each console, television, sound system, and computer. I was pretty lousy as I was new, but my coworkers, they hit their numbers and eventually I did to.I'm not sure of how old you are, but laser and belt drive issues on the PS2 were common knowledge to anyone around my age and we used that to our advantage.

Of course Xbox 360 inflated those numbers for a time. We were attaching protection plans to 40% of those suckers but that didn't last, and I'm not sure how it pertains to the attach rate of the switch as that attach rate did not stick for ps3, PS4, Xbox one, nor switch.

Before my exit out of the retail space 2 years ago, protection plan attachment has dropped around 5% across the board as store sales staff has been cut along with less seasoned sales staff due to higher turnover rate. Add the fact that nearly half of all revenue is derived from online sales or in store pickup and it's expected. Maybe 3-5% of in store pickups have protection plans attached. People generally don't buy extended warranties unless someone is there selling it to them.

In closing, as I said earlier your assumption is missguided.
 

StormCell

Member
I glossed over nothing. You're creating your own argument I never made, I said the best selling titles were of the portable reality overall and they are, it's completely lopsided, either handheld games or iterations or handheld variations of usually consoles games using handheld mechanics, which you saw with the DS, the 3DS, the PSP, and the Vita. There's this very strange attempt to act as if the Switch is competing with Xbox and PS when it doesn't, it does have games that are effectively console games, and some work even better when docked than undocked arguably, doesn't change the fact that the handheld focused or modified software isn't the dominant of hardware sales, especially recently if you exclude older releases.
What do you mean by "using handheld mechanics"?

Here's the list of top-selling games for Switch. You will see it's heavily lopsided but not in any way that you described.

1. Mario Kart 8 Deluxe 46.82 million (home console)
2. Animal Crossing: New Horizons 39.38 million (home console)
3. Super Smash Bros Ultimate 28.82 million (home console)
4. Breath of the Wild 27.14 million (home console)
5. Pokemon Sw&Sh 24.50 million (handheld)
6. Super Mario Odyssey (home console)
7. Super Mario Party 18.06 million (home console / no handheld)
8. Pokemon BD&BP 14.79 million (handheld)
9. Pokemon Let's Go 14.66 million (handheld)
10. Ring Fit Adventure 14.54 million (home console / no handheld)
11. New Super Mario Bros U Deluxe 13.31 million (home console)
12. Splatoon 2 13.30 million (home console)
13. Pokemon Legends: Arceus 12.64 million (handheld)
14. Luigi's Mansion 3 11.43 million (home console)
15. Super Mario 3D World + Bowser 9.43 million (home console)
16. Super Mario 3D All-Stars 9.01 million (home console)
17. Monster Hunter Rise 7.70 million (handheld)
18. Super Mario Maker 2 7.15 million (home console)
19. Mario Party Superstars 6.88 million (home console / no handheld)
20. LoZ: Link's Awakening 5.49 million (handheld)

I could even keep going, but just from the top 20 I count 14 top sellers that are traditionally Nintendo home console games. 3 of those have no handheld mode. What is this "of the portable reality" that you claimed? If you're talking about there having been handheld iterations of some of these games, that doesn't make them portable games suddenly, because the DS/3DS became a place where some home console games would play. Everything labeled above as home console is a game that launched for home console or is a present iteration of a home console game.

Anyway, Nintendo Switch is Nintendo's home for their home console games. They even make top-selling software that can only be played in docked or tabletop mode (ie. no handheld).
 

Eddie-Griffin

Gold Member
What do you mean by "using handheld mechanics"?

Here's the list of top-selling games for Switch. You will see it's heavily lopsided but not in any way that you described.

1. Mario Kart 8 Deluxe 46.82 million (home console)
2. Animal Crossing: New Horizons 39.38 million (home console)
3. Super Smash Bros Ultimate 28.82 million (home console)
4. Breath of the Wild 27.14 million (home console)
5. Pokemon Sw&Sh 24.50 million (handheld)
6. Super Mario Odyssey (home console)
7. Super Mario Party 18.06 million (home console / no handheld)
8. Pokemon BD&BP 14.79 million (handheld)
9. Pokemon Let's Go 14.66 million (handheld)
10. Ring Fit Adventure 14.54 million (home console / no handheld)
11. New Super Mario Bros U Deluxe 13.31 million (home console)
12. Splatoon 2 13.30 million (home console)
13. Pokemon Legends: Arceus 12.64 million (handheld)
14. Luigi's Mansion 3 11.43 million (home console)
15. Super Mario 3D World + Bowser 9.43 million (home console)
16. Super Mario 3D All-Stars 9.01 million (home console)
17. Monster Hunter Rise 7.70 million (handheld)
18. Super Mario Maker 2 7.15 million (home console)
19. Mario Party Superstars 6.88 million (home console / no handheld)
20. LoZ: Link's Awakening 5.49 million (handheld)

You basically proved my point but don't seem to actually realize it, and added home console to games that are actually mechanically based on portable entries in those franchises. No different than the "console" games on the PSP and Vita. You do have some actual console games on the list but it's overwhelming in favor of portability mechanical design in mind with this list.

What is this "of the portable reality" that you claimed?

Fairly certain i didn't say the quote you're suggesting. Read above.

Anyway, Nintendo Switch is Nintendo's home for their home console games. They even make top-selling software that can only be played in docked or tabletop mode (ie. no handheld).

That's great, and there are some features on a GBA that can only be used when hooked up to a Gamecube, but that doesn't make the GBA a home console. The Vita had ports of home consoles games too, is it a home consoles because it had ports of home consoles games? No?

The first thing you take out the box when you buy a witch is a tablet, the dock itself is only there to optimally display the Switch on a TV but the dock itself isn't console hardware and require the Switch to be inserted to be of any use.
 
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