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Microsoft to reveal its next generation of Windows on June 24th

My desktop is:

Windows 10 64-Bit
Ryzen 5 2400G with Radeon Vega Graphics at 3.60 Ghz
8 GIGS of RAM
256GB of NVMeSSD

It is NOT eligible for Windows 11 upgrade.

What are the minimum requirements for windows 11 upgrade? WTF?!!! :messenger_pouting:
 

jshackles

Gentlemen, we can rebuild it. We have the capability to make the world's first enhanced store. Steam will be that store. Better than it was before.
My desktop is:

Windows 10 64-Bit
Ryzen 5 2400G with Radeon Vega Graphics at 3.60 Ghz
8 GIGS of RAM
256GB of NVMeSSD

It is NOT eligible for Windows 11 upgrade.

What are the minimum requirements for windows 11 upgrade? WTF?!!! :messenger_pouting:
Does your PC have a TPM 2.0 hardware module? That's where most people are gonna be stubbing their toe on this upgrade, regardless of how fast their PC is.

My home gaming PC is a pre-built Dell from 2018 with a Ryzen 7, RX580, 32GB DDR4 RAM, but Windows 11 fails to install because it doesn't have a TPM 2.0 module on the motherboard.
 
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Does your PC have a TPM 2.0 hardware module? That's where most people are gonna be stubbing their toe on this upgrade, regardless of how fast their PC is.

My home gaming PC is a pre-built Dell from 2018 with a Ryzen 7, RX580, 32GB DDR4 RAM, but Windows 11 fails to install because it doesn't have a TPM 2.0 module on the motherboard.
How can me or an average consumer check to see if it has TPM 2.0 hardware module?
 

jshackles

Gentlemen, we can rebuild it. We have the capability to make the world's first enhanced store. Steam will be that store. Better than it was before.
How can me or an average consumer check to see if it has TPM 2.0 hardware module?
Start -> Run -> tpm.msc

About half way down the screen there will be "Status" which will give you an indication if Windows detects you have one. Even if it says no, you may still be able to boot into your BIOS / UEFI settings (by pressing a button combo as your PC is booting up, different depending on your motherboard manufacturer) and looking for TPM settings. A lot of boards actually ship with a TPM module that's disabled by default.
 
According to Microsoft Website:

Processor1 gigahertz (GHz) or faster with 2 or more cores on a compatible 64-bit processor or System on a Chip (SoC)
Memory4 GB RAM
Storage64 GB or larger storage device
System firmwareUEFI, Secure Boot capable
TPMTrusted Platform Module (TPM) version 2.0
Minimum system requirements
Graphics cardDirectX 12 compatible graphics / WDDM 2.x
Display>9” with HD Resolution (720p)
Internet connectionMicrosoft account and internet connectivity required for setup for Windows 11 Home
Certain features require specific hardware, see detailed system requirements.
 
Start -> Run -> tpm.msc

About half way down the screen there will be "Status" which will give you an indication if Windows detects you have one. Even if it says no, you may still be able to boot into your BIOS / UEFI settings (by pressing a button combo as your PC is booting up, different depending on your motherboard manufacturer) and looking for TPM settings. A lot of boards actually ship with a TPM module that's disabled by default.


I meet the requirements so why am I still not eligible?
 

jshackles

Gentlemen, we can rebuild it. We have the capability to make the world's first enhanced store. Steam will be that store. Better than it was before.
I meet the requirements so why am I still not eligible?
Good question. Are you running Windows with secure boot enabled in your BIOS / UEFI settings? Are you booting Windows 10 in BIOS (Legacy) mode, or UEFI mode?

There are tons of reasons why their tool might be lying to you though. That's so Microsoft.
 
Good question. Are you running Windows with secure boot enabled in your BIOS / UEFI settings? Are you booting Windows 10 in BIOS (Legacy) mode, or UEFI mode?

There are tons of reasons why their tool might be lying to you though. That's so Microsoft.
oh man how do i check that? this is a desktop that i got from microcenter prebuilt from them at clearance ...lol

edit: sorry you are not my IT guy. I will search and resolve this on my own. Thanks for your helpful leads. With that being said, why should anyone have to jump through hoops for basic upgrade. It is so Microsoft indeed.
 
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Mohonky

Member
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Haha, MS is going to have to walk that one back so fast. They will instantly make half or more of the world's computers ineligible for update if they really require TPM 2.0.
 

jshackles

Gentlemen, we can rebuild it. We have the capability to make the world's first enhanced store. Steam will be that store. Better than it was before.
If they expect the average user to fuck around in the BIOS just to upgrade windows this thing is DOA.
"Oh sorry your PC isn't new enough to be eligible for our free upgrade program. Please buy a new PC." -Microsoft, probably
 

Mato

Member
So you can't run this without TPM 2.0? That's insane, that must amount to hundreds of millions of PCs.

I have this MSI motherboard. It appears to have a port that can receive stand-alone TPM modules. But for some reason those modules appear to be rather niche and hard to find. Anyone know anything about this?
 
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eddie4

Genuinely Generous
Yeah, i have TPM off, and even though i have an i9 and 32gb of ram and 1tb sdd, sorry you can't run windows 11. stupid little requirement
 
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jshackles

Gentlemen, we can rebuild it. We have the capability to make the world's first enhanced store. Steam will be that store. Better than it was before.
Vertical tabs in Edge should be the default

Fight me
 

Atrus

Gold Member
Presentation felt lacklustre, like some sort of work training video where the presenters can't nail the genuine relatability of a Youtuber. Panos Panay looks way too choked up for someone who has to sell us on a product.

A free upgrade is nice but not when there's this TPM2.0 nonsense that means I won't be participating until I get a new PC even though I meet all the other requirements.
 

Bitmap Frogs

Mr. Community
I watched the even a little bit and it's always the same when microsoft tries to play it cool - they just can't. Macos is the yuppie underdog so that's the cool one, and Linux is the geekie underdog so that's the techie one. Windows is stuck in the default limbo.
 

Pagusas

Elden Member
Presentation felt lacklustre, like some sort of work training video where the presenters can't nail the genuine relatability of a Youtuber. Panos Panay looks way too choked up for someone who has to sell us on a product.

A free upgrade is nice but not when there's this TPM2.0 nonsense that means I won't be participating until I get a new PC even though I meet all the other requirements.

this is one of those things I scratched my head at too, i didnt honestly know anything about TPM till I read this thread, went into my bios (Asus Dark Hero) and enabled fTPM (as apparently i have a slot for a descrete tpm on the board but the actual thing is sold seperate?) regardless, fTPM seemed to fix everything up. I cant imagine how many others are going to have this issue day 1.
 

jshackles

Gentlemen, we can rebuild it. We have the capability to make the world's first enhanced store. Steam will be that store. Better than it was before.
The TPM2.0 requirement for Windows 11 is definitely going to be controversial, but from a security standpoint it means faster widespread adoption and proliferation of the technology - which I see as a good thing.

The shitty part will be that, like I said before, it's fairly common practice for motherboards to include a TPM module that's disabled by default. Most people will run the Microsoft tool and think their PC simply isn't up to snuff, when all they need to do is actually enable the hardware they already have. It's going to lead to higher sales of newer PCs, which is probably a side effect that Microsoft considers to be a bonus.
 

Codes 208

Member
My pc should run this easily, but I’m definitely curious how my surface pro 7 (4gb, i5 model) would handle the update
 

jshackles

Gentlemen, we can rebuild it. We have the capability to make the world's first enhanced store. Steam will be that store. Better than it was before.
There is an offline option.
There won't be an offline option for the HOME version of Windows 11. You'll need to be online, and you'll have to sign in with your Microsoft account.
 

BadBurger

Is 'That Pure Potato'
Them restricting this to TPM 2.0 means it won't be adopted, especially by business, for a long-ass fucking time. They need to fix that.
 

kittoo

Cretinously credulous
Start -> Run -> tpm.msc

About half way down the screen there will be "Status" which will give you an indication if Windows detects you have one. Even if it says no, you may still be able to boot into your BIOS / UEFI settings (by pressing a button combo as your PC is booting up, different depending on your motherboard manufacturer) and looking for TPM settings. A lot of boards actually ship with a TPM module that's disabled by default.

Yupe. Just to confirm I have a 5600x and a Gigabyte B550 Aorus pro mobo. The TPM.MSC initially said it wasnt able to find TPM, but I went to bios and in settings->miscellaneous there was an AMD fTPM setting. Enabled it voila- TPM is there. Maybe this can help a few people.
 

Valonquar

Gold Member
In order to get it say you are eligible you need to be using UEFI, Secure Boot, and TPM 2.0. TPM 2.0 is basically a bios setting that stores your encryption key for full disk encryption. Nothing so far has suggested you'll be forced to actually enable Bitlocker, but guessing they will force it for everything except Home editions.
 

Hari Seldon

Gold Member
The more I think about it the more I dig this tpm requirement as an easy way to prevent MS from doing some auto install in the middle of the night. Going to keep this disabled for a long while.
 
Windows 11 seems a step in the right direction but the implementation is always a disaster. I will wait until there are several more stable builds of windows 11 after its initial release, and with more official concrete info from microsoft
 

Loope

Member
I enabled TPM through BIOS, he recognized it and it's 2.0. But MS tool says i'm not eligible to do the update, then i tried the UEFI setting in BIOS and it just won't boot, keeps getting back to the BIOS menu. So, for now, i'll just leave it at that.
 
Them restricting this to TPM 2.0 means it won't be adopted, especially by business, for a long-ass fucking time. They need to fix that.
My work only just moved to Windows 10 this year and even then out of like 200 PCs in the building there are only 4 of them that run W10. The rest are still on Windows 7.

it’s gonna be a long ass fucking time before I see W11 on a PC either way.
 
Yay! My £300 motherboard I got in 2019 doesn’t have TPM 2.0 apparently. Tried looking to enable something in BIOS but can’t see anything.

the support site for the board says it has a port to connect one so I guess I need to go buy one unless MS drops this ridiculous requirement.


TPM 2.0 enabled! But MS still says no Windows 11 for me.
 
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Dr Bass

Member
I did like the shots they took at Apple in terms of developer stuff. I hope this is a good release. Apple needs real competition. The MS tablet direction just makes so much more sense to me (one OS, apps everywhere), and yet iPads still seem incredibly popular. Will keep an eye on this as a currently strict Apple user.
 

01011001

Member
Yay! My £300 motherboard I got in 2019 doesn’t have TPM 2.0 apparently. Tried looking to enable something in BIOS but can’t see anything.

the support site for the board says it has a port to connect one so I guess I need to go buy one unless MS drops this ridiculous requirement.

I almost bet that they will drop it. there's already a small outcry on twitter over this
 
I almost bet that they will drop it. there's already a small outcry on twitter over this
I managed to enable it. If MS expects people to go into BIOS to enable this then it’s DOA. I’m not intimidated by a BIOS but if I need a guide to enable it then a lot of people will be confused, end up break something in BIOS, or just not bother trying.

running tpm.msc now says I have TPM 2.0 but the MS health check app says I still can’t run Windows 11 lol. Oh Microsoft….
 

01011001

Member
I managed to enable it. If MS expects people to go into BIOS to enable this then it’s DOA. I’m not intimidated by a BIOS but if I need a guide to enable it then a lot of people will be confused, end up break something in BIOS, or just not bother trying.

running tpm.msc now says I have TPM 2.0 but the MS health check app says I still can’t run Windows 11 lol. Oh Microsoft….

it could also be an issue with the health check app... or is it officially announced that you will need TPM2.0?
 

jshackles

Gentlemen, we can rebuild it. We have the capability to make the world's first enhanced store. Steam will be that store. Better than it was before.
If MS expects people to go into BIOS to enable this then it’s DOA.
MS expects people to simply buy a new device with Windows 11 already installed. Seems pretty obvious, since that's they only way they're able to actually get money for this OS.

Especially in the day and age where off the shelf computers are designed to run 3-5 years tops.
 

jshackles

Gentlemen, we can rebuild it. We have the capability to make the world's first enhanced store. Steam will be that store. Better than it was before.
Interesting, I wonder why only the pro version has offline as an option.
Presumably for people like me who have to automate the OOB experience (setup hardware, rename PC, install corporate software, etc.) and attach the new PC to our local domain (which is not even possible on Home editions). Sometimes I have to roll out thousands of PCs at a time, and if I had to stop on each one so that I could sign into a Microsoft account, this would turn the process from taking a few weeks into one that would take several months. In a typical office or corporate environment, you have a comparatively small number of technicians doing this for a large number of people. I imagine if Microsoft thought they could get away with it, they'd require it for Pro and Enterprise customers too, but they know that nobody would adopt it if you add that much manpower cost to the initial setup.

For home users, there is a typical one-to-one relationship between the person setting up the computer and the person who will be using it. They don't care about wasting one person's time (10 minutes, tops) especially when it means they have a better way of tracking that user and selling them a subscription to Game Pass or Office 365.
 

LordCBH

Member
My ASUS Maximus VIII Hero doesn’t have any TPM options in the UEFI, but there is a vacant TPM header on the board. I should just be able to buy a TPM2.0 module to fulfill microsofts retarded TPM requirement right?
 
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